Borg Early Career Award (BECA) Shared by A.J. Brush and Radhika Nagpal

Originally Printed in the Summer/Fall 2010 Newsletter

The Committee on the Status of Women in Computing Research (CRA-W) is pleased to announce that the recipients of the 2010 Borg Early Career Award are A.J. Bernheim Brush, a researcher at Microsoft Research and Radhika Nagpal, an Associate Professor of Computer Science at Harvard University.

The award honors the late Anita Borg, who was an early member of CRA-W.  It is given annually by CRA-W to a woman in computer science and/or engineering who has made significant research contributions and who also has contributed to her profession, especially in the outreach to women. This award is targeted at women that are relatively early in their careers.

A.J. Bernheim Brush is a researcher at Microsoft Research in Redmond, Washington, USA. Her main research interest is human-computer interaction with a focus on computer supported collaborative work (CSCW) and ubiquitous computing. She enjoys investigating how technology can help people and families with everyday problems including coordination, awareness, and energy conservation. A.J. has organized regular lunchtime events for women researchers at Microsoft and mentoring panels for  graduate student women interns in the summer.  She has been a speaker at the CRA-W Grad Cohort Workshop.  She graduated from Williams College and earned her Ph.D. in Computer Science at the University of Washington. She has served as ACM SIGCHI VP for Membership and Communications from 2006 – 2009, as the program co-chair for the Perva-sive 2009 conference, and on the editorial advisory board of the International Journal of Human-Computer Interaction.

Radhika Nagpal is an Associate Professor of Computer Science at Harvard University and a member of the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering. She received her PhD degree in Computer Science from MIT, and spent a year as a research fellow at Harvard Medical School. She is a recipient of the 2005 Microsoft New Faculty Fellowship award and the 2007 NSF Career award. Her research interests are in bio-inspired multi-agent systems, their application to robotics and networks, and understanding multi-cellular systems in biology. Her activities include mentoring of undergraduate competitive teams and outreach to K-12 girls.