Computing Research Policy Blog

The Computing Research Association (or CRA) has been involved in shaping public policy of relevance to computing research for more than two decades. More recently the CRA Government Affairs program has enhanced its efforts to help the members of the computing research community contribute to the public debate knowledgeably and effectively.

Posts in the category.

DARPA’s Tether Continues to Lose His Fight with Congress

From the explanatory statement for the Continuing Resolution that will fund government agencies until March 6, 2009: Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) The fiscal year 2009 budget request for DARPA is $3,285,569,000, an increase of $326,493,000, more than 10 percent, over the fiscal year 2008 appropriated program of $2,959,076,000. In recent years, DARPA has […]

House Dems Want to Punt Approps Until March 2009

The House is apparently moving to pass a continuing resolution for the FY 09 appropriations until March 6, 2009 — essentially deferring any decision on final appropriations levels to the new Congress and Administration. This is not unexpected — we’ve been talking about this since February — but it’s still bad news. Under this plan, […]

Basic Energy Research Press Event

The Task Force on the Future of American Innovation and the Science Coalition held a press conference this morning on “Fueling America’s Future”–the importance of federal funding for basic energy research. While both groups support a broad basic research agenda, this event emphasized the need for basic research in energy to solve America’s energy crisis. […]

McCain Answers Science Debate 2008

Now that Senator John McCain has supplied his answers to the Science Debate 2008 questions, we can take a look at the similarities and differences between the two candidates on a topic that could determine the United States’ competitive and economic future in the next administration. We highlighted some of Senator Obama’s answers here earlier […]

Obama Answers Science Debate 2008

Senator Barack Obama responded to fourteen science questions asked by Science Debate 2008 regarding how an Obama White House would lead the US in areas vital to our competitiveness and innovation. All fourteen questions and Obama’s answers in their entirety can be found here. Some highlights of most importance to the computing community include: Q […]