The number of new undergraduate computing majors among U.S. computer science departments rose an astonishing 29.2 percent this year, according to new data released today by the Computing Research Association.

The average number of CS majors per U.S. CS departmentThe data appears in Computing Degrees and Enrollment Trends, a special report from the 2011-2012 CRA Taulbee Survey of the organization’s member departments. Among schools who responded to the survey both this year and last, the increase was 22.8 percent.

Overall Ph.D. production in computing programs reported in the survey reached its highest level ever, with 1,929. This represents an 8.2 percent increase over 2010-11. Among those departments reporting both this year and last year, the number of total doctoral degrees increased by 5.2 percent. More than 55 percent of those new degree holders took jobs in industry, with the remainder finding academic or government positions, or self-employment. Only 0.4 percent reported unemployment. The survey also found that bachelor’s degree production in computing fields increased by 19.8 percent overall, and 16.6 percent among those departments that reported both years. Production of Bachelor's Degrees in the US (CS, CE and I Departments)

The CRA Taulbee Survey is conducted annually by the CRA to document trends in student enrollment, degree production, employment of graduates, and faculty salaries in academic units in the United States and Canada that grant the Ph.D. in computer science, computer engineering, or information. CRA today released its Computing Degrees and Enrollment Trends, 2011-12 report. The full Taulbee dataset will be released to the public in May and published in CRA’s Computing Research News.

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Total enrollments among U.S. computer science undergraduates Trends in CS Undergraduate Enrollment - From the CRA Taulbee Surveyincreased 10 percent in 2010, data from the most recent annual CRA Taulbee Survey show. This is the third straight year of increases in total enrollment and indicates that the post “dot-com crash” decline in undergraduate computing program enrollments is over.

The CRA Taulbee Survey is conducted annually by CRA to document trends in student enrollment, degree production, employment of graduates, and faculty salaries in Ph.D-granting departments of computer science (CS), computer engineering (CE) and information (I) in the United States and Canada. CRA today released the enrollment and degree production results (available as a pdf) from the latest edition of the survey.

Overall bachelor’s degree production in computer science, computer engineering and information sciences departments in 2010 rose nearly 11 percent from that in 2009 . Bachelor’s degree production in computer science departments was up more than 9 percent. The increases in new students observed during each of the past two years have resulted in increased degree production, a welcome turnaround from the past several years of declining bachelor’s degree production. Undergraduate CS degree production for 2010 -- CRA Taulbee Survey

Also notable from the survey:

  • Ph.D. production in computing programs held steady in 2009-2010, following a drop in production last year.
  • Among CRA member schools, the share of bachelor’s degrees in CS granted to females rose to 13.8 percent in 2010, an increase of 2.5 percentage points over 2009. The share of bachelor’s degrees in CS granted to minority students held nearly steady at 10.3 percent in 2010.

The full report, which also includes information about faculty size, demographics and salaries, graduate student support and research expenditures, will be available in May 2011 on the CRA web site.