Convergence of Data and Computing Task Force

Chairs: Vasant Honavar
Vasant HonavarVasant Honavar

Pennsylvania State University

Bio

Vasant Honavar Website


Vasant Honavar is a Professor and Edward Frymoyer Chair of Information Sciences and Technology and Professor of Bioinformatics and Genomics and of Neuroscience at Pennsylvania State University where he currently leads the Artificial Intelligence Research Laboratory and the Big Data Analytics and Discovery Informatics Initiative. Honavar has served as a Program Director in the Information and Intelligent Systems Division at the National Science Foundation (during 2010-2013) where he contributed to multiple programs including Information Integration and Informatics, Smart and Connected Health, and led the Big Data Science and Engineering Program. Prior to joining Pennsylvania State University, Honavar was Professor of Computer Science and of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology and Director of the Artificial Intelligence Research Laboratory (during 1990-2013), and Chair of the Bioinformatics and Computational Biology Ph.D. program (during 2003-2005) at Iowa State University. He served on the National Institutes of Health study section on Biological Data Management and Analysis during 2002-2007. Honavar’s current research and teaching interests span Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, Bioinformatics, Big Data Analytics, Computational Molecular Biology, Data Mining, Discovery Informatics, Information Integration, Knowledge Representation and Inference, Semantic Technologies, Health Informatics, Neuroinformatics, Social Informatics and Security Informatics. His research (documented in over 250 peer-reviewed publications) has contributed scalable approaches to learning predictive models from “big data” – including in particular, very large, distributed, semantically disparate, richly structured data (including tabular, sequence, network, relational, time series data); knowledge-based, statistical and network-based approaches to integrating information, Eliciting causal information from multiple sources of observational and experimental data; Selective sharing of knowledge across disparate knowledge bases; Representing and reasoning about preferences; Composing complex services from components; and applications in bioinformatics and computational molecular and systems biology. Honavar has graduated over 30 PhD students, many of whom are leaders in academia and industry. Honavar currently serves on the editorial boards of several journals including IEEE/ACM Transactions on Computational Biology and Bioinformatics. He has served as a general co-chair of the IEEE International Conference on Big Data (2014). Honavar earned his Ph.D. degree from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1990.

Current Members:

Tom ConteTom Conte
Georgia Institute of Technology

Bio

Tom Conte Website


Tom Conte is a native of Delaware , but served his time in a corn field in the middle of Illinois, escaping only when he received his Ph.D. from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 1992. From 1992-1995, he was an Assistant Professor at the University of South Carolina in Columbia, SC, where he met his wife (which was just about the only good thing that happened to him in South Carolina).
In 1995, Conte moved to NC State University (in Raleigh, NC), where he was an Assistant Professor (1995-1998), then an Associate Professor (1998-2002), and then an adjective-free Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering . Somewhere in there (2000-2001) he took a short detour to DSP startup BOPS, inc. to serve as a manager of their back and compiler group and “Chief Microarchitect” (because they already had a “Chief Architect”). After cursing Computer Science as a faux discipline for decades, he accidentally became a professor of Computer Science at Georgia Tech, where he suffers to this day.

Conte currently directs a bunch of Ph.D. students in topics ranging from compiler design to advanced microarchitectures. His research is or has been supported by DARPA, Compaq (formerly Digital), Hewlett-Packard (formerly Compaq), IBM, Intel, TI, Sun, NASA, and the National Science Foundation.

Mark HillMark Hill
CCC Vice Chair
University of Wisconsin, Madison

Bio

Mark Hill Website


Mark D. Hill is the Gene M. Amdahl Professor of Computer Sciences and Electrical & Computer Engineering at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, where he also co-leads the Wisconsin Multifacet project with David Wood. His research interests include parallel computer system design, memory system design, computer simulation, deterministic replay and transactional memory. He earned a PhD from University of California, Berkeley. He is an ACM Fellow and a Fellow of the IEEE.

Klara NahrstedtKlara Nahrstedt
University of Illinois at Urbana – Champaign

Bio

Klara Nahrstedt Website


Klara Nahrstedt is the Ralph and Catherine Fisher Professor in the Computer Science Department, and Acting Director of Coordinated Science Laboratory in the College of Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Her research interests are directed towards 3D teleimmersive systems, mobile systems, Quality of Service (QoS) and resource management, Quality of Experience in multimedia systems, and real-time security in mission-critical systems. She is the co-author of widely used multimedia books `Multimedia: Computing, Communications and Applications’ published by Prentice Hall, and ‘Multimedia Systems’ published by Springer Verlag. She is the recipient of the IEEE Communication Society Leonard Abraham Award for Research Achievements, University Scholar, Humboldt Award, IEEE Computer Society Technical Achievement Award, and the former chair of the ACM Special Interest Group in Multimedia. She was the general chair of ACM Multimedia 2006, general chair of ACM NOSSDAV 2007 and the general chair of IEEE Percom 2009.

Klara Nahrstedt received her Diploma in Mathematics from Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany in numerical analysis in 1985. In 1995 she received her PhD from the University of Pennsylvania in the Department of Computer and Information Science. She is an ACM Fellow, IEEE Fellow, and Member of the Leopoldina German National Academy of Sciences.

Holly RushmeierHolly Rushmeier
Yale University

Bio

Holly Rushmeier Website


Holly Rushmeier is a professor in the Yale Department of Computer Science. Her research interests include shape and appearance capture, applications of perception in computer graphics, modeling material appearance and developing computational tools for cultural heritage. From 1996 to early 2004 Rushmeier was a research staff member at the IBM T.J. Watson Research Center. At IBM she worked on a variety of data visualization problems in applications ranging from engineering to finance. She also worked in the area of acquisition of data required for generating realistic computer graphics models, including a project to create a digital model of Michelangelo’s Florence Pieta, and the development of a scanning system to capture shape and appearance data for presenting Egyptian cultural artifacts on the World Wide Web. Rushmeier was Editor-in-Chief of ACM Transactions on Graphics from 1996-99 and co-EiC of Computer Graphics Forum (2010-2014). She has also served on the editorial boards of IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics, ACM Journal of Computing and Cultural Heritage and IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications. She currently serves the editorial boards of ACM Transactions on Applied Perception, ACM Transactions on Graphics, the Visual Computer and Computers and Graphics. This is Holly’s first year on the CCC Council.

Klara NahrstedtKathy Yelick
University of California at Berkeley

Bio

Kathy Yelick Website


Katherine Yelick is a Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences at the University of California at Berkeley and is also the Associate Laboratory Director for Computing Sciences at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. She is the co-author of two books and more than 100 refereed technical papers on parallel languages, compilers, algorithms, libraries, architecture, and storage. She co-invented the UPC and Titanium languages and demonstrated their applicability across architectures through the use of novel runtime and compilation methods. She also co-developed techniques for self-tuning numerical libraries, including the first self-tuned library for sparse matrix kernels which automatically adapts the code to properties of the matrix structure and machine. Her work includes performance analysis and modeling as well as optimization techniques for memory hierarchies, multicore processors, communication libraries, and processor accelerators. She has worked with interdisciplinary teams on application scaling, and her own applications work includes parallelization of a model for blood flow in the heart. She earned her Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from MIT and has been a professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences at UC Berkeley since 1991 with a joint research appointment at Berkeley Lab since 1996. She has received multiple research and teaching awards and is a member of the California Council on Science and Technology and a member of the National Academies committee on Sustaining Growth in Computing Performance.

Public materials produced and curated for this task force include:

The CCC task force on the Convergence of Data and Computing leads activities at the intersections of Big Data, High Performance Computing, and the future of HPC.

Big Data has been a major theme of CCC’s over the years. In 2008, the CCC held two events for Big Data that coalesced the research community and the usage community. A number of CCC’s white papers focused on the topic. These have been credited by the Office of Science Technology Policy (OSTP) with helping to shape the Federal Big Data Initiative. The CCC also partnered with AAAI for the 2016 Symposium on Accelerating Science: A Grand Challenge for AI.

On the other hand, computing challenges have been discussed in CCC and National Academy works, such as 21st Century Computer Architecture in 2012 and The Future of Computing Performance: Game Over or Next Level? in 2011.

Data and Computing White Papers

  • Opportunities and Challenges for Next Generation Computing 
    • Discusses potential opportunities enabled by radical increases in computing performance with decreased power, and which suggests some possible pathways to achieve these ends.  With increased performance and decreased power, computing could have major impacts on societal issues such as new search engines for science, better understanding of human-in-the-loop systems, monitoring and anticipating of extreme weather conditions, and understanding quantum effects in materials and chemistry.
  • Accelerating Science: A Computing Research Agenda
    • Seeks to articulate a research agenda for developing cognitive tools that can augment human intellect and partner with humans on the scientific process.

Related Workshops

  • Symposium on Accelerating Science: A Grand Challenge for AI: In November 2016, the CCC co-sponsored a AAAI Symposium that brought together researchers in relevant areas of artificial intelligence (e.g., machine learning, causal inference, knowledge representation and inference, planning, decision making, human computer interaction, distributed problem solving, natural language processing, multi-agent systems, semantic web, information integration, scientific workflows), high performance data and computing infrastructures and services, and selected application areas (e.g., life sciences, learning sciences, health sciences, social sciences, food energy and water nexus) to discuss progress on, and articulate a research agenda aimed at addressing, the AI grand challenge of accelerating science. A workshop report is in progress.