Radically Responsible Computing Task Force

Current Members

David ParkesDavid C. Parkes
Harvard University

Bio

David C. Parkes

Website


David ParkesDavid C. Parkes is the George F. Colony Professor of Computer Science in the Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences at Harvard University, where he founded the EconCS research group and leads research with a focus on artificial intelligence, machine learning, and economics. He is co-director of the Harvard University Data Science Initiative, a faculty co-lead for planning the expansion of the Paulson school into the Allston campus, and was Area Dean for Computer Science, 2013-2017. Parkes served on the inaugural panel of the “Stanford 100 Year Study on Artificial Intelligence,” co-organized the 2016 OSTP Workshop on “AI for Social Good,” and served as chair of the ACM Special Interest Group on Electronic Commerce (2011-16). Parkes is Fellow of the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence (AAAI), and recipient of the 2017 ACM/SIGAI Autonomous Agents Research Award, the NSF Career Award, the Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship, the Thouron Scholarship, and the Roslyn Abramson Award for Teaching. Parkes has degrees from the University of Oxford and the University of Pennsylvania, serves on several international scientific advisory boards, and is a technical advisor to a number of start-ups.

Melanie

Melanie Mitchell
Portland State University

Bio

Melanie Mitchell

Website


Melanie

Melanie Mitchell is Professor of Computer Science at Portland State University, and External Professor and Member of the Science Board at the Santa Fe Institute. She attended Brown University, where she majored in mathematics and did research in astronomy, and the University of Michigan, where she received a Ph.D. in computer science, Her dissertation, in collaboration with her advisor Douglas Hofstadter, was the development of Copycat, a computer program that makes analogies. She has held faculty or professional positions at the University of Michigan, the Santa Fe Institute, Los Alamos National Laboratory, the OGI School of Science and Engineering, and Portland State University.

She is the author or editor of five books and over 80 scholarly papers in the fields of artificial intelligence, cognitive science, and complex systems. Her most recent book, Complexity: A Guided Tour (Oxford, 2009), won the 2010 Phi Beta Kappa Science Book Award. It was also named by Amazon.com as one of the ten best science books of 2009, and was longlisted for the Royal Society’s 2010 book prize. Melanie originated the Santa Fe Institute’s Complexity Explorer project, which offers online courses and other educational resources related to the field of complex systems.

Moses

Melanie Moses
University of New Mexico

Bio

Melanie Moses

Website


MosesMelanie Moses is a Professor of Computer Science at the University of New Mexico and an External Faculty Member at the Santa Fe Institute. She studies complex biological and information systems, the scaling properties of networks, and the general rules governing the acquisition of energy and information in complex adaptive systems. She models distributed search processes in ant colonies and immune systems, and she designs bio-inspired, scalable swarms of robots that can autonomously cooperate and adapt to environmental conditions. She draws insights, tools, and approaches from different disciplines in an effort to find unifying principles in nature and computation.Her Ph.D is in Biology from the University of New Mexico and she has a B.S. in Symbolic Systems from Stanford University with a concentration in Agent Based Modeling. She has led the NASA Swarmathon and NM CSforAll to engage thousands of women and underrepresented minority students in computer science research and education.

SiekKatie Siek
Indiana University

Bio

Katie Siek

Website


Siek

Katie Siek is an associate professor in Informatics at Indiana University. Her primary research interests are in human computer interaction, health informatics, and ubiquitous computing. More specifically, she is interested in how sociotechnical interventions affect personal health and well being. Her research is supported by the National Institutes of Health, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and the National Science Foundation including a five-year NSF CAREER award. She has been awarded a CRA-W Borg Early Career Award (2012) and a Scottish Informatics and Computer Science Alliance Distinguished Visiting Fellowship (2010 & 2015).

Suresh

Suresh Venkatasubramanian
University of Utah

Bio

Suresh Venkatasubramanian

Website


SureshSuresh Venkatasubramanian is a professor at the University of Utah. His background is in algorithms and computational geometry, as well as data mining and machine learning. His current research interests lie in algorithmic fairness, and more generally the problem of understanding and explaining the results of black box decision procedures. Suresh received a CAREER award from the NSF for his work in the geometry of probability, as well as a test-of-time award at ICDE 2017 for his work in privacy. His research on algorithmic fairness has received press coverage across North America and Europe, including NPR’s Science Friday, NBC, and CNN, as well as in other media outlets. He is a member of the board of the ACLU in Utah, and is a member of New York City’s Failure to Appear Tool (FTA) Research Advisory Council.

The Responsible and Inclusive Computing task force was established in fall 2020 in order to lead the CCC’s activities related to fairness, privacy, and the responsibility for the negative outcomes of algorithms.

Resources curate for this task force include: