Computing Research Policy Blog

The Computing Research Association (or CRA) has been involved in shaping public policy of relevance to computing research for more than two decades. More recently the CRA Government Affairs program has enhanced its efforts to help the members of the computing research community contribute to the public debate knowledgeably and effectively.

Posts in the category.

FY06 Appropriations: In the end game, Basic Research and Cognitive Computing get cut

House and Senate negotiators have reached agreement on one of the final hurdles in the FY 06 appropriations process: the FY06 Defense Appropriations bill (H.R. 2863), which contains cuts to DOD Basic Research, DARPA’s Cognitive Computing program (though not as bad as originally feared) and the long rumored 1.0 percent “across the board” cut to […]

Boston Globe: In computer science, a growing gender gap

The Boston Globe has a great, fairly in-depth piece today on the declining interest of women in computer science. Reporter Marcella Bobardieri writes: Born in contemporary times, free of the male-dominated legacy common to other sciences and engineering, computer science could have become a model for gender equality. In the early 1980s, it had one […]

CRA Endorses National Innovation Act

As mentioned previously, today Sens. John Ensign (R-NV) and Joseph Lieberman (D-CT) plan to introduce the National Innovation Act of 2005, a bill that would enact many of the recommendations of the National Innovation Initiative report put out by the Council on Competitiveness last December. The bill would do a lot of important stuff: Establish […]

IT Companies Step Up Where DARPA Steps Back

Some good coverage in the press of an announcement today by Google, Microsoft and Sun that they’ll help jointly fund (to the tune of $1.5 million a year for five years) Dave Patterson’s new Reliable, Adaptive, and Distributed systems Lab (RAD Lab) at UC Berkeley. Both the NY Times and San Jose Mercury News note […]

DMCA Slowed Disclosure of Sony/BMG Spyware

CRA has often argued that the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) — enacted in 1998 to combat digital piracy — is disruptive to the process of research. When computer security researchers feel compelled by the potential liability created by DMCA to consult with an army of attorneys before moving forward with previously legitimate research, there’s […]