Mentoring Tracks at Grace Hopper 

Upcoming

Are you planning to attend the next Grace Hopper conference?  Would you like to receive mentoring and career guidance from successful senior women in your field? CRA-W sponsors mentoring sessions for:

Undergraduates

Learn about the what, why and how of undergraduate research, how to get accepted and then thrive in graduate school, and the differences between Master’s and Ph.D programs.

October 21, 2016 (Friday)

9:00 AM
Student Opportunity Lab

Student Opportunity Lab (Session 1): Searching for a job in industry, academia or government? Looking for an internship or research opportunity? Thinking about continuing your studies? If you answered yes to any of these questions, the interactive Student Opportunity Lab (SOL) might be the session for you. Mentors and speakers will hold brief sessions at their own tables. Navigate your own path through the tables featuring topics of interest to you.

CRA-W Tables:

    • Research Careers — What Are the Options?  How Do I Get There? Mentor: Rita Wouhaybi, Deb AgarwalAmina ShabbeerBrandeis Marshall
      • What does a research career in computing look like? What are the options in academia? Industry? Government? What can you do to best prepare yourself for one of these careers? How do you successfully apply for them? Come chat with researchers in academia, industry, and government about these questions and more
    • How to Be Successful Post-Bachelor’s? Mentor: Heidi Ellis, Jodi Tims, Priyanka Gopalakrishna, Valerie Barr
      • You are well on your way to earning a bachelor’s degree (congratulations!). What’s next? Should you consider graduate school? Should you look for a full-time job? What are the pros and cons of these career decisions, and how can you set yourself up to be successful post-bachelor’s? Come chat with professionals about the types of doors that are open with a bachelor’s degree in computing.
    • Is Graduate School For You? Mentor: Tanya Amert, Darakhshan Mir, Jici Huang
      • Is graduate school in computer science and engineering for you? What benefits do you get once you have a graduate degree? Come chat with students and professionals from industry and academia who will help you understand what it’s like to be in graduate school, and the options you’ll have when you finish. 
    • Master’s or Ph.D.? (2 Tables) Mentor: Mary Anne EganBushra Anjum, Alexa Sharp, Ambareen Siraj, Martha Crosby, Diane Woodbridge, Adrienne Decker, Suzanne Matthews
      • Considering either a Master’s or Ph.D.? Not sure about the difference? Come chat about the main differences in career options and in graduate studies between a Master’s and Ph.D. degree. Topics include realistic goals and expectations for each degree and various strategies for deciding which degree to pursue.
    • How to Successfully Apply to Graduate School? (3 Tables) Mentor: Sunita Chandrasekaran, Dilma Da Silva, Sara Sprenkle, Ying Lu, Monica Anderson, Lauren Wilcox, Jenny Walter, Boots Cassel, Jessica Wu, Soha Hassoun, Stephanie Ludi, Ursula Wolz
      • Considering either a Master’s or Ph.D.? Not sure about the difference? Come chat about the main differences in career options and in graduate studies between a Master’s and Ph.D. degree. Topics include realistic goals and expectations for each degree and various strategies for deciding which degree to pursue.
    • What is Computing Research?  How Can Undergraduates Participate? (2 Tables) Mentor: Jeannie Albrecht, Maria Gini, Marie desJardins, Ellen Walker, Nanette Veilleux, Madeline Smith, Veronica Vergara Larrea, Amy Csizmar Dalal
      • How do you choose the right graduate school for you? Is there anything you can do during college to improve your chances of being admitted? How do you apply? What is the time line for completing the application process? What are the best kinds of recommendations? How can you fund graduate school? Come talk with graduate students, professors, and professionals in industry about how to apply successfully to graduate school.
FRIDAY OCT 21st, 2016

9am-10am

Building Your Academic Professional Network

Sunita Chandrasekaran (University of Delaware)

Soha Hassoun (Tufts University)

Effective networking with others in your community is one of the most powerful tools in advancing your professional career.  This skill can connect you to your community in meaningful ways, land you a dream job, and help you score awards or promotions.  Join us to learn how to present yourself and your ideas in a concise and appealing way, as well as how to deliberately build and nurture your professional network.


FRIDAY OCT 21st, 2016

 10:30am-11:30am

The Graduate School Experience

Laura Dillon (Michigan State University)

Katie Siek (Indiana University Bloomington)

Is graduate school in computing for you? What’s it like to pursue a Masters or PhD degree? What benefits do you get once you have the degree? This session will help you understand what it’s like to be in graduate school, and the exciting options you’ll have when you finish.


FRIDAY OCT 21st, 2016

12pm-1pm

Finding Your Dream Job with a Ph.D.

Dilma Da Silva (Texas A&M)

Rita Wouhaybi (Intel Labs)

Curious about the range of post-Ph.D. career options in academia and industry? Looking for some practical advice on how to apply for jobs, interview, and negotiate a job offer? If yes, this session is for you. Researchers who have completed successful job searches and are now working in different jobs will talk about their experiences and answer your questions.

Graduate Students

Learn how to thrive in graduate school, how to build your professional persona and network, and how to find your dream job. Senior graduate students may also be interested in topics for Early Career.


Want to be a Bias Interruptor?

Wednesday, October 19 | 2-3:50 p.m.

After a short primer on unconscious biases that exist in academic computing departments, we will teach you how to become a “bias interruptor” in your classrooms, department meetings and research labs, giving you time to practice your new skill with other attendees. Once you are familiar with being a human bias interrupter, we’ll turn to the software we create. Yes, software also has biases which we’ll learn about in a technical presentation by an expert in the field.

Speakers:

Latanya Sweeney, Professor of Government and Technology in Residence, Harvard University
Brad McLain, Social Scientist, National Center for Women & Information Technology
Valerie Barr, Professor of Computer Science, Union College
Tracy Camp, Professor of Computer Science, Colorado School of Mines
Lucy Sanders, CEO and Co-founder, National Center for Women & Information Technology

“Want to be a Bias Interruptor?” is a program developed and organized jointly by ACM-W,
CRA-W, and NCWIT.


FRIDAY OCT 21st, 2016

9am-10am

Building Your Academic Professional Network

Sunita Chandrasekaran (University of Delaware)

Soha Hassoun (Tufts University)

Effective networking with others in your community is one of the most powerful tools in advancing your professional career.  This skill can connect you to your community in meaningful ways, land you a dream job, and help you score awards or promotions.  Join us to learn how to present yourself and your ideas in a concise and appealing way, as well as how to deliberately build and nurture your professional network.


FRIDAY OCT 21st, 2016

 10:30am-11:30am

The Graduate School Experience

Laura Dillon (Michigan State University)

Katie Siek (Indiana University Bloomington)

Is graduate school in computing for you? What’s it like to pursue a Masters or PhD degree? What benefits do you get once you have the degree? This session will help you understand what it’s like to be in graduate school, and the exciting options you’ll have when you finish.


FRIDAY OCT 21st, 2016

12pm-1pm

Finding Your Dream Job with a Ph.D.

Dilma Da Silva (Texas A&M)

Rita Wouhaybi (Intel Labs)

Curious about the range of post-Ph.D. career options in academia and industry? Looking for some practical advice on how to apply for jobs, interview, and negotiate a job offer? If yes, this session is for you. Researchers who have completed successful job searches and are now working in different jobs will talk about their experiences and answer your questions.

Early Career

Learn how to start, manage and grow your own research program and how to achieve success in your field.


Want to be a Bias Interruptor?

Wednesday, October 19 | 2-3:50 p.m.

After a short primer on unconscious biases that exist in academic computing departments, we will teach you how to become a “bias interruptor” in your classrooms, department meetings and research labs, giving you time to practice your new skill with other attendees. Once you are familiar with being a human bias interrupter, we’ll turn to the software we create. Yes, software also has biases which we’ll learn about in a technical presentation by an expert in the field.

Speakers:

Latanya Sweeney, Professor of Government and Technology in Residence, Harvard University
Brad McLain, Social Scientist, National Center for Women & Information Technology
Valerie Barr, Professor of Computer Science, Union College
Tracy Camp, Professor of Computer Science, Colorado School of Mines
Lucy Sanders, CEO and Co-founder, National Center for Women & Information Technology

“Want to be a Bias Interruptor?” is a program developed and organized jointly by ACM-W,
CRA-W, and NCWIT.


THURSDAY OCT 20th, 2016

9-10am

Balancing the Demands in Academia (Teaching, Research, and Service)

Amy Csizmar Dalal (Carleton College)

Maria Gini (University of Minnesota)

Pre-tenure careers can be stressful, as the demands from teaching, research, and service can often seem never-ending. How can one thrive in academia, when one needs to make a mark in each of these categories? We’ll begin our discussion on the importance of understanding your institution’s expectations; we’ll then discuss strategies for creating a good balance that leads to success in each of these categories.


THURSDAY OCT 20th, 2016

10:30-11:30am

Effective Teaching Tactics

Valerie Barr (Union College)

Susan Rodger (Duke University)

In this session, we will cover both current theories on educational pedagogy as well as very practical suggestions and resources to thrive in the classroom. We will discuss planning course goals and objectives, options for how to use class time, and ways to foster a fun, interactive learning environment. We will also present classroom management techniques and strategies for what to do when things don’t go as intended.


THURSDAY OCT 20th, 2016

1-2pm

Research/Funding Strategies for Faculty 

Andrea Danyluk (Williams College)

Lucy Nowell (Department of Energy)

Growing your research program means tapping into resources that help you be more successful. Funding can enable you to attract more students, or work on larger projects. Collaboration enables you to work with people outside your area of expertise, initiate new projects, and have a lot of fun. This session will cover strategies for creating a successful research program.


THURSDAY OCT 20th, 2016

2:30-3:30pm

Preparing for Tenure and Promotion

Julia Hirschberg (Columbia University)

Jodi Tims (Baldwin Wallace University)

Do you know what steps you need to take to prepare for tenure and promotion? We will provide practical advice on developing a successful promotion and tenure portfolio in teaching, research, and service. This session will also discuss department expectations, annual reviews, letter writers, and the importance of understanding the local culture.  Lastly, we will discuss what to do if things don’t go as planned.


THURSDAY OCT 20th, 2016

4-5pm

Gaining Recognition for Your Accomplishments in Academia 

Nancy Amato (Texas A&M)

Ellen Walker (Hiram College)

Being known and gaining recognition for your accomplishments is key for career advancement. This session will discuss the different types of opportunities for recognition that exist for academics. The discussion will include strategies for gaining recognition for your accomplishments and for helping others to be recognized both within and outside your organization.

Mid to Advanced Career

Learn principles of successful leadership and discuss best practices for managing your career.


Unfortunately CRA-W will not have sessions for Mid to Advance Career women at GHC this year.  CRA-W is involved in the Academic Corner session on Wednesday afternoon, which may be of interest to you. Details follow.

Wednesday, October 19th, 2016
Title: Academics: Want to be a Bias Interrupter?

Abstract: After a short primer on unconscious biases that exist in academia, we will teach you how to become a “bias interruptor” in your classrooms, department meetings, and research labs, giving you time to practice your new skill with other attendees.  Once you are familiar with being a human bias interrupter, we’ll turn to software. Yes, software also has biases which we’ll learn about in a tech talk.

Resources


This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number (1246649). Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

Additional Information


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