Tag Archive: CCC

Artificial Intelligence Roadmap Workshop 3 – Learning and Robotics

Given the increasingly pervasive use in AI technologies in all sectors of industry and government and the enormous potential for future AI-based technologies, NSF has asked the Computing Community Consortium to organize an AI Roadmap to help prioritize research investments. The third workshop theme is Learning and Robotics and will take place on January 17-18, 2019 in San Francisco. The chairs of the Learning and Robotics workshop are Fei-Fei Li (Stanford University) and Thomas G. Dietterich (Oregon State University). This is part of the AI Roadmap workshop series – view the series page here.

Artificial Intelligence Roadmap Workshop 2 – Interaction

Given the increasingly pervasive use in AI technologies in all sectors of industry and government, and the enormous potential for future AI-based technologies, NSF has asked the Computing Community Consortium to organize an AI Roadmap to help prioritize research investments. The second workshop theme is interaction and will take place on November 14-15, 2018 in Chicago. The chairs of the interaction workshop are Kathy McKeown (Columbia University) and Dan Weld (University of Washington). This is part of the AI Roadmap workshop series – view the series page here.

Content Generation for Workforce Training

The CCC will hold a visioning workshop in Atlanta, GA in March 2018 to discuss and articulate research visions for authoring rich graphical content for new workforce training. The workshop aims to articulate research challenges and needs and to summarize the current state of the practice in this area.

Artificial Intelligence Roadmap Workshop 1 – Integrated Intelligence

Given the increasingly pervasive use in AI technologies in all sectors of industry and government, and the enormous potential for future AI-based technologies, NSF has asked the Computing Community Consortium to organize an AI Roadmap to help prioritize research investments. The first workshop theme is Integrated Intelligence and will take place on November 14-15, 2018 in Chicago. The chairs of the Integrated Intelligence workshop are Marie desJardins (Simmons University) and Ken Forbus (Northwestern University). This is part of the AI Roadmap workshop series – view the series page here.

Thermodynamic Computing

Thermodynamics has been a historical concern in the engineering of conventional computing systems due to its role in power consumption, scaling, and device performance. Today, we see thermodynamics re-emerging in a new role as an algorithmic technique in areas such as machine learning, annealing, quantum, and neuromorphic systems. Recent theoretical developments in non-equilibrium thermodynamics suggest thermodynamics may become the basis of a new “thermodynamic computing” paradigm. For example, it may lead to computing systems that self-organize in response to external input.

A Roadmap for US Robotics

Over the last two decades, the internet has—in many ways—transformed our daily lives from work routines to social networking. The internet is an impressive media for interconnecting computers. However, almost all these computers are passive devices with no or very limited facilities for interaction with the physical world. Robots—on the other hard—are devices designed to interact intelligently with the environment. Over the next decade or two the prediction is that robotics will impact our daily lives in manners that, at least, matches the way the internet has impacted our life.

Early Career Researcher Symposium

The workshop was 1.5 days in the Washington, DC area. It was an opportunity for attendees to meet National Science Foundation program officers as well as representatives from other agencies. The content covered at the workshop came from the 2017 CCC Symposium, recent CCC visioning workshops, and CRA programs for Career Mentoring and Leadership in Science Policy.

Next Steps in Quantum Computing: Computer Science’s Role

While it has been known for some time that quantum computers could in principle solve problems that are intractable on today’s supercomputers such as breaking public key cryptography and solving hard computational chemistry problems, the field of quantum computing is still at an early stage. Recent progress in realizing small scale quantum computers is encouraging and these devices may scale up further in the near future. However, currently, only very few opportunities exist to bring quantum computing experts together with experts from other computer science fields with much to offer: programming languages, compiler design, computer architecture, and design automation in an exchange of ideas.