Workshop Reports

The reports below are the outcomes of the CCC’s visioning activities.

Visions in Theoretical Computer Science Workshop Report

Date Published: 6 Jul 2021

[BibTeX]
@techreport{shuchi chawla2021visions,
  author={Shuchi Chawla, Jelani Nelson, Chris Umans and David Woodruff},
  title={Visions in Theoretical Computer Science Workshop Report},
  institution={Computing Community Consortium},
  year={2021},
  number={ Report 2},
  address={Washington, D.C.},
  month={7}
}

The CCC and the SIGACT Committee for the Advancement of Theoretical Computer Science co-sponsored a virtual visioning workshop in July 2020 for the theoretical computing community. This workshop gave the community the opportunity to reflect on and discuss accomplishments and hardships within the theory field over the past decade. This report summarizes key takeaways from […]

CCC / Code 8.7 Applying AI in the Fight Against Modern Slavery

Date Published: 24 Jun 2021

[BibTeX] [Download PDF]
@techreport{daniel lopresti2021ccc,
  author={Daniel Lopresti, Nadya Bliss, Mark Briers, Alice Eckstein, James Goulding, Anjali Mazumder, Gavin Smith},
  title={CCC / Code 8.7 Applying AI in the Fight Against Modern Slavery},
  institution={Computing Community Consortium},
  year={2021},
  number={Report 1},
  address={Washington, D.C.},
  month={6},
  url={https://cra.org/ccc/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2021/06/CCC-Code-8-7-Report-Final.pdf},
  note={}
}

On any given day, tens of millions of people find themselves trapped in instances of modern slavery. This CCC visioning workshop, organized in collaboration with Code 8.7, brought bring together members of the computing research community along with anti-slavery practitioners and survivors to lay out a research roadmap aimed at applying AI to the fight against human trafficking. After brief introductions including opportunities to hear from survivors, advocates, and policy experts, the workshop turned to a series of highly interactive sessions on a selection of computing research topics selected in advance by the organizing committee. Please read the full report to learn more.

Assured Autonomy: Path Toward Living With Autonomous Systems We Can Trust

Date Published: 27 Oct 2020

[BibTeX] [Download PDF]
@techreport{ufuk topcu 2020assured,
  author={Ufuk Topcu and Nadya Bliss and Nancy Cooke and Missy Cummings and Ashley Llorens and Howard Shrobe and Lenore Zuck},
  title={Assured Autonomy:
Path Toward Living With Autonomous Systems We Can Trust},
  institution={Computing Community Consortium},
  year={2020},
  number={Workshop Report 4},
  address={Washington, D.C.},
  month={10},
  url={https://cra.org/ccc/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2020/10/Assured-Autonomy-Workshop-Report-Final.pdf},
  note={}
}

Autonomy is becoming mainstream. The anticipation is that cyber-physical-human systems and services enabled by autonomy will improve the future work conditions and the quality of life for humans and create new business models. On the other hand, a number of looming challenges—whether autonomous systems are safe and secure, whether we can assure their safety and security, whether humans will ever trust and work with them, whether we can integrate them at scale and whether we can do all these economically—overshadow the popular belief that a revolution driven by autonomy is imminent.

The CCC's series of three workshops on assured autonomy aimed to create a unified understanding of the goals for assured autonomy and the research trends as well as near-term, mid-term and long-term research needs supporting these goals. The first workshop took place October 16-17 in Arlington, VA, and the second workshop took place February 20-21, 2020 in Phoenix, AZ. A third workshop took place virtually July 29, 2020. A workshop report was released in October 2020. Learn more about the workshops on the series webpage.

The Role of Robotics in Infectious Disease Crises

Date Published: 9 Jul 2020

[BibTeX] [Download PDF]
@techreport{gregory hager 2020role,
  author={Gregory Hager and Vijay Kumar and Robin Murphy and Daneila Rus and Russell Taylor},
  title={The Role of Robotics in Infectious Disease Crises},
  institution={Computing Community Consortium},
  year={2020},
  number={Workshop Report 5},
  address={Washington, D.C.},
  month={10},
  url={https://cra.org/ccc/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2020/10/Workshop-Final-Report-The-Role-of-Robotics-in-Infectious-Disease-Crises.pdf},
  note={This is a note.}
}

The CCC and National Academy of Engineering (NAE) co-sponsored a virtual workshop to study the role of robotic systems in infectious disease crises on July 9-10th, 2020. The report briefly 1) identifies key challenges faced by health care responders and the general population; 2) examines robotic/technological responses to these challenges; 3) identifies key research/knowledge barriers that need to be addressed in developing effective, scalable solutions; 4) identifies workforce training, regulatory, and infrastructure needs that should be addressed in order to enable rapid deployment of these systems; and 5) suggests follow-on steps to more fully develop and implement this strategy. A workshop report was released in October 2020.

Wide Area Data Analytics

Date Published: 17 Jun 2020

[BibTeX] [Download PDF]
@techreport{r. agarwal 2020wide,
  author={R. Agarwal and J. Rexford},
  title={Wide-Area Data Analytics},
  institution={Computing Community Consortium},
  year={2020},
  number={Workshop Report 3},
  address={Washington, D.C.},
  month={6},
  url={https://cra.org/ccc/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2020/06/CCC-SUD-Workshop-Report-FINAL.pdf},
  note={}
}

The CCC held a visioning workshop on Wide Area Data Analytics in Washington, DC in October 2019 to discuss and articulate research visions for authoring rich graphical content for new workforce training. The workshop was organized by Rachit Agarwal (Cornell University) and CCC Council Member Jen Rexford (Princeton University) to identify challenges and opportunities in data analytics and related research given that modern datasets are often distributed across many locations. In some cases, datasets are naturally distributed because they are collected from multiple locations, such as sensors spread throughout a geographic region. In other cases, datasets are distributed across different data centers to improve scalability or reliability, or to reduce cost; these distributed locations could be a mix of public clouds, private data centers, and edge computing sites.

Read the full workshop report here

Grand Challenges for Embedded Security Research in a Connected World

Date Published: 12 May 2020

[BibTeX] [Download PDF]
@techreport{denise anthony 2020grand,
  author={Denise Anthony and Wayne Burleson and Kevin Fu and Jo. Guarjardo and Carl Gunter and Kyle Ingols and Jean-Baptiste Jeannin and F.arinaz Koushanafar and Carl Landwehr and S. Squires},
  title={Grand Challenges for Embedded Security Research in a Connected World},
  institution={Computing Community Consortium},
  year={2020},
  number={Workshop Report 1},
  address={Washington, D.C.},
  month={5},
  url={https://cra.org/ccc/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2020/05/CCC\_Embedded\_Security\_Report\_final.pdf},
  note={This is a note.}
}

In August of 2018 the CCC held the one day Leadership in Embedded Security visioning workshop. Embedded systems such as pacemakers, autonomous vehicles, and the Internet of Things often have real-time constraints and electromechanical components that lead to qualitatively different vulnerabilities and solutions from traditional computing systems. Embedded security is the study of physical properties, computational properties, and human factors to protect such embedded systems from attack. The workshop was organized by former CCC Council Member Kevin Fu (University of Michigan), Wayne Burleson (UMass Amherst), and Farinaz Koushanfar (UC, San Diego).

The workshop brought together around fifty academics, industrial researchers, and government agency program managers who work close to the topic of embedded security. The workshop included deep dive group discussions as well as short visionary talks by several international speakers to lend perspectives on successful strategies for funding embedded security research overseas. The report, titled Grand Challenges for Embedded Security Research in a Connected World, focuses on the challenges and potential research opportunities across five major areas of embedded security:

  • Medical and health devices,
  • Drones and transportation,
  • Smart homes,
  • Industry and supply-chain,
  • The smart grid and critical infrastructure.

Content Generation for Workforce Training

Date Published: 11 Dec 2019

[BibTeX] [Download PDF]
@techreport{holly rushmeier 2019content,
  author={Holly Rushmeier and Kapil Chalil Madathil and Jessica Hodgins and Beth Mynatt and Tony Derose and Blair Macintyre},
  title={Content Generation for Workforce Training},
  institution={Computing Community Consortium},
  year={2019},
  number={Workshop Report 7},
  address={Washington, D.C.},
  month={12},
  url={https://cra.org/ccc/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2018/10/CCC-Content-Generation-for-Workforce-Training-Final-Report.pdf},
  note={}
}

The CCC held a visioning workshop on Content Generation for Workforce Training in Atlanta, GA in March 2019 to discuss and articulate research visions for authoring rich graphical content for new workforce training. The workshop’s goal was to articulate research challenges and needs and to summarize the current state of the practice in this area. This workshop was in response to growing needs in the field and new research programs such as the National Science Foundation (NSF) Future of Work at the Human-Technology Frontier: Advancing Cognitive and Physical Capabilities (FW-HTF).

Historically, materials such as books and movies were used in addition to hands-on experiences for education and practical training. Increasingly, various other types of computer generated media have been developed. Computer-driven simulators and augmented/virtual reality experience have been used in place of or as a complement to hands-on experiences. Computer networks aid in the rapid dissemination of these materials and frameworks. However, the authoring of this material is still a time-consuming process requiring specialized computing skills. The goal of this workshop is to examine how computational methods for content authoring can be revolutionized to allow educators to focus only on pedagogical and application specific issues in preparing new education and training materials. By simplifying the authoring of content, materials can be prepared more rapidly. The iterative improvement of materials can be enabled/enhanced. Further, by freeing educators from extraneous concerns, materials of higher quality can be prepared.

Computational Support for Substance Use Disorder Prevention, Detection, Treatment, and Recovery

Date Published: 14 Nov 2019

[BibTeX] [Download PDF]
@techreport{lana yarosh 2020computational,
  author={Lana Yarosh and Suzanne Bakken and Alan Borning and Munmun De Choudhury and Cliff Lampe and Elizabeth Mynatt and Stephen Schueller and Tiffany Veinot},
  title={Computational Support for Substance Use Disorder Prevention, Detection, Treatment, and Recovery},
  institution={Computing Community Consortium},
  year={2020},
  number={Workshop Report 2},
  address={Washington, D.C.},
  month={6},
  url={https://cra.org/ccc/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2020/06/CCC-SUD-Workshop-Report-FINAL.pdf},
  note={}
}

In the United States, 20.2 million adults or 8% of the population is estimated to suffer from a substance use disorder (SUD). SUDs include a wide array of substances such as alcohol, opioids, methamphetamine, and other substances and are characterized by an inability to decrease use, despite severe social, economic, and health-related consequences to the individual. In 2017, the US Department of Health & Human Services declared a public health emergency to combat what has been termed as “the opioid epidemic” and highlighted five critical strategies: 1) Improving access to treatment and recovery services; 2) Promoting use of overdose-reversing drugs; 3) Strengthening our understanding of the epidemic through better public health surveillance; 4) Providing support for cutting edge research on pain and addiction; and 5) Advancing better practices for pain management. Computational support may contribute to each of these strategies by mobilizing a new set of systems, algorithms, and tools to understand and combat substance use disorders. These technologies may provide scalable and accessible complementary approaches to traditional methods and services.

In November, 2019 the CCC held a workshop to the discuss opportunities and challenges to developing such computational support systems in Washington, D.C. A workshop report was released in June 2020.

Thermodynamic Computing

Date Published: 4 Nov 2019

[BibTeX] [Download PDF]
@techreport{tom conte 2019thermodynamic,
  author={Tom Conte and Erik DeBenedictis and Natesh Ganesh and Todd Hylton and Susanne Still and John Paul Strachan and R. Stanley Williams},
  title={Thermodynamic Computing},
  institution={Computing Community Consortium},
  year={2019},
  number={Workshop Report 6},
  address={Washington, D.C.},
  month={11},
  url={https://cra.org/ccc/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2019/10/CCC-Thermodynamic-Computing-Reportv3.pdf},
  note={}
}

In January 2019, the CCC held the 2.5-day Thermodynamic Computing visioning workshop which brought together physical theorists, electrical and computer engineers, electronic/ionic device researchers, and theoretical biologists to explore a novel idea: computing as an open thermodynamic system. The workshop was organized by Tom Conte (Georgia Tech), Erik DeBenedictis (Sandia National Laboratories), Natesh Ganesh (University of Massachusetts Amherst), Todd Hylton (UC San Diego), Susanne Still (University of Hawaii), John Paul Strachan (Hewlett Packard Lab HPE), R. Stanley Williams (Texas A&M), with the support of the CCC’s (now-retired) Post Moore's Law Computing Task Force

The report begins by explaining the need for thermodynamic computers: with the end of Moore’s Law and Dennard scaling we will require novel methods of computing to continue making improvements to computational efficiency. It follows that “if we want to make computers function more efficiently then we should care about energy and its ability to efficiently create state changes — i.e. we should care about thermodynamics” (page 1). We can find inspiration for such computing methods in living systems – like the human brain or a folding protein – that are able to spontaneously find energy-efficient configurations. What if we could build a computer that worked in a similar way? We call this inherent, adaptive computing process that is driven by thermodynamics, thermodynamic computing. This report contemplates uses for such future systems and then outlines a potential roadmap to develop them.

Algorithmic and Economic Perspectives on Fairness

Date Published: 11 Sep 2019

[BibTeX] [Download PDF]
@techreport{david c. parkes 2019algorithmic,
  author={David C. Parkes and Rakesh V. Vohra},
  title={Algorithmic and Economic Perspectives on Fairness},
  institution={Computing Community Consortium},
  year={2019},
  number={Workshop Report 4},
  address={Washington, D.C.},
  month={9},
  url={https://cra.org/ccc/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2019/01/Algorithmic-and-Economic-Perspectives-on-Fairness.pdf},
  note={This is a note}
}

In May 2019, the CCC held the 1.5-day Economics and Fairness visioning workshop in Cambridge, Massachusetts, which brought together computer science researchers with backgrounds in algorithmic decision-making, machine learning, and data science with policy makers, legal experts, economists, and business leaders to discuss methods to ensure economic fairness in a data-driven world. The workshop was organized by David Parkes (Harvard University, CCC Council) and Rakesh Vohra (University of Pennsylvania), with the support of the CCC’s Fairness and Accountability Task Force

The report highlights the current trends and uses of algorithmic decision making systems, such as credit scoring, resume screening, and recommendation systems; the central concepts needed to evaluate the fairness and equity of such data-based systems; and the outstanding computing research challenges needed to tackle these kinds of problems. Unfortunately, as the report notes, “At present, there is a paucity of work that seeks to quantify the effect on outcomes across the many domains where we will see automated decision making. Measuring the effect of an algorithm on an outcome is inherently difficult because decisions made (or influenced) by an algorithm may have happened identically in the absence of the algorithm.”

Community Roadmap for AI Research

Date Published: 7 Aug 2019

[BibTeX] [Download PDF]
@techreport{yol201920,
  author={Yolanda Gil and Bart Selman},
  title={A 20-Year Community Roadmap for Artificial Intelligence Research in the US},
  institution={Computing Community Consortium},
  year={2019},
  number={Workshop Report 3},
  address={Washington, D.C.},
  month={8},
  url={hhttps://cra.org/ccc/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2019/08/Community-Roadmap-for-AI-Research.pdf}
}

In fall 2018, the Computing Community Consortium (CCC) started a new initiative to create a Roadmap for Artificial Intelligence, led by Yolanda Gil (University of Southern California and President of AAAI) and Bart Selman (Cornell University and President-Elect of AAAI). A series of three workshops were held in the Fall/Winter of 2018/2019, with the goal of identifying challenges, opportunities, and pitfalls, and create a compelling report that will effectively inform future federal priorities—including future AI R&D Investments. The final report is now available. Learn more about the process of creating the workshop report here.

Research Opportunities in Sociotechnical Interventions for Health Disparity Reduction

Date Published: 2 Aug 2019

[BibTeX] [Download PDF]
@techreport{katie siek 2019sociotechnical,
  author={Katie Siek and Tiffany Veinot and Beth Mynatt},
  title={Sociotechnical Interventions for Health Disparity Reduction},
  institution={Computing Community Consortium},
  year={2019},
  number={Workshop Report 2},
  address={Washington, D.C.},
  month={8},
  url={https://cra.org/ccc/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2018/01/17602-CCC-Health-Disparities-ReportFinal.pdf}
}

The CCC's 1.5 day Sociotechnical Interventions for Health Disparity Reduction workshop took place in April 2018 in New Orleans, co-located with the Society for Behavioral Medicine’s 39th Annual Meeting.

This cross-disciplinary workshop, brought together leading researchers in computing, health informatics, and behavioral medicine to develop an integrative research agenda regarding sociotechnical interventions to reduce health disparities and improve the health of socio-economically disadvantaged populations. The workshop report addresses the discussions and conclusions from the workshop.

Authored by Katie Siek (Indiana University), Tiffany Veinot (University of Michigan), and Beth Mynatt (Georgia Tech).

AI Research Roadmap – Draft for Community Input (May 2019)

Date Published: 13 May 2019

[BibTeX] [Download PDF]
@techreport{yol2019ai,
  author={Yolanda Gil and Bart Selman},
  title={AI Research Roadmap – Draft for Community Input (May 2019)},
  institution={Computing Community Consortium},
  year={2019},
  number={Draft for Community Input 1},
  address={Washington, D.C.},
  month={5},
  url={https://cra.org/ccc/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2019/05/AIRoadmapDraftforCommunityMay2019.pdf}
}

In fall 2018, the Computing Community Consortium (CCC) started a new initiative to create a Roadmap for Artificial Intelligence, led by Yolanda Gil (University of Southern California and President-Elect of AAAI) and Bart Selman (Cornell University). A series of three workshops were held in the Fall/Winter of 2018/2019, which resulted in a Roadmap produced in the Spring of 2019. The goal of the initiative was to identify challenges, opportunities, and pitfalls, and create a compelling report that will effectively inform future federal priorities—including future AI R&D Investments. This effort is similar to one of the CCC’s first activities, the Robotics Roadmap, which helped to launch the National Robotics Initiative in 2011 and the subsequent 2016 Robotics Roadmap and NRI 2.0.

A draft of the report is now available. CCC would value your comments on this draft report, including the findings and recommendations. Please submit your comments here by May 28, 2019.

Artificial Intelligence Roadmap Executive Summary

Date Published: 11 Mar 2019

[BibTeX] [Download PDF]
@techreport{yol2019artificial,
  author={Yolanda Gil and Bart Selman},
  title={Artificial Intelligence Roadmap Executive Summary},
  institution={Computing Community Consortium},
  year={2019},
  number={Executive Summary 1},
  address={Washington, D.C.},
  month={3},
  url={https://cra.org/ccc/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2019/03/AI\_Roadmap\_Exec\_Summary-FINAL-.pdf}
}

In fall 2018, the Computing Community Consortium (CCC) started a new initiative to create a Roadmap for Artificial Intelligence, led by Yolanda Gil (University of Southern California and President-Elect of AAAI) and Bart Selman (Cornell University). A series of three workshops were held in the Fall/Winter of 2018/2019, which resulted in a Roadmap produced in the Spring of 2019. The goal of the initiative was to identify challenges, opportunities, and pitfalls, and create a compelling report that will effectively inform future federal priorities—including future AI R&D Investments. This effort is similar to one of the CCC’s first activities, the Robotics Roadmap, which helped to launch the National Robotics Initiative in 2011 and the subsequent 2016 Robotics Roadmap and NRI 2.0. This Executive Summary provides an overview of the roadmap, which is now available here.

Identifying Research Challenges in Post Quantum Cryptography Migration and Cryptographic Agility

Date Published: 1 Feb 2019

[BibTeX] [Download PDF]
@techreport{david ott 2019identifying,
  author={David Ott and Christopher Peikert},
  title={Identifying Research Challenges in Post Quantum Cryptography Migration and Cryptographic Agility},
  institution={Computing Community Consortium},
  year={2019},
  number={Workshop Report 2},
  address={Washington, D.C.},
  month={2},
  url={https://cra.org/ccc/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2018/11/CCC-Identifying-Research-Challenges-in-PQC-Workshop-Report.pdf}
}

In January 2019, the CCC held a workshop on Identifying Research Challenges in Post Quantum Cryptography Migration and Cryptographic Agility. The implications of sufficiently large quantum computers for widely used public-key cryptography is well documented, and increasingly discussed by the security community. An April 2016 report by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), notably, calls out the need for new standards to replace cryptosystems based on integer factorization and discrete logarithm problems, which have been shown to be vulnerable to Shor’s algorithm. Specifically, widely used RSA, ECDSA, ECDH, and DSA cryptosystems will need to be replaced by post-quantum cryptography (PQC, also known as quantum-resistant cryptography) alternatives. To realize this, NIST has actively led a PQC standardization effort since December of 2016, leveraging a large and international research community. The effort is expected to take five or more years to vet proposals, and to select alternatives that are believed to be secure against both quantum and classical computers. The overall objective of this workshop was to identify academic research challenges in PQC migration and cryptographic agility. To discuss these challenges, the workshop brought together researchers and thought leaders from three distinct communities: PQC researchers who are involved in the design and analysis of cryptographic algorithms, applied cryptography researchers who focus more extensively on the application and implementation of cryptography to a variety of spheres, and systems security researchers who use cryptography as a building block in real-world security architectures and solutions (e.g., trusted computing, cloud security).

Next Steps in Quantum Computing: Computer Science’s Role

Date Published: 12 Nov 2018

[BibTeX] [Download PDF]
@techreport{margaret martonosi 2018next,
  author={Margaret Martonosi and Martin Roetteler, and workshop attendees},
  title={Next Steps in Quantum Computing: Computer Science’s Role},
  institution={Computing Community Consortium},
  year={2018},
  number={Workshop Report 3},
  address={Washington, D.C.},
  month={11},
  url={https://cra.org/ccc/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2018/11/Next-Steps-in-Quantum-Computing.pdf}
}

The two-day workshop on Next Steps in Quantum Computing: Computer Science’s Role was held May 22-23, 2018 in Washington DC and brought together over 50 researchers from quantum computing, computer architecture, electronic design automation, compiler construction, and classical programming languages in order to bridge the interdisciplinary gap in the field. Open questions this group discussed includes new methods for circuit synthesis and optimization, compiler optimizations and rewriting, embedded languages versus non-embedded languages, implementations of type systems and error reporting for quantum languages, and techniques for verifying the correctness of quantum programs.

Authored by Margaret Martonosi (Princeton) and Martin Roetteler (Microsoft), with contributions from numerous workshop attendees and other contributors as listed in Appendix A.

Robotic Materials

Date Published: 8 Nov 2018

[BibTeX] [Download PDF]
@techreport{nikolaus correll 2018robotic,
  author={Nikolaus Correll and Ray Baughman and Richard Voyles and Lining Yao and Dan Inman},
  title={Robotic Materials},
  institution={Computing Community Consortium},
  year={2018},
  number={Workshop Report 2},
  address={Washington, D.C.},
  month={8},
  url={https://cra.org/ccc/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2018/01/CCC-Robotic-Materials-Report-FINAL.pdf}
}

The CCC's 1.5 day Robotic Materials workshop built upon the inaugural AFOSR/ARO-sponsored workshop on “Robotic Materials” at CU Boulder, and the CCC-sponsored workshop on “Material Robotics” at RSS in Cambridge, MA.

Biological tissues such as the camouflaging skin of an octopus, the wing of a bat, a bone, or the wood of a Banyan tree exhibits a level of functionality and autonomy that engineers can only dream of. While wood and bone have already become poster-childs of bio-inspired composite materials for their impressive structural properties, the material science community has not really appreciated that the structural properties of these systems are only a small subset of the functionality that living wood and living bone provide: self-repair, adapting their structure to changing loading conditions, or storing energy for the organisms they serve. Functionally speaking, these tissues are composites that tightly integrate sensing, actuation, computation and communication. They are made of materials that can harvest, metabolize and store energy to power computers that interact with sensors and actuators that affect their physical properties or make them move. This workshop explored how computer science is not only needed to understand the algorithms that drive such future materials, but also how to make them.

Authored by Nikolaus Correll (University of Colorado Boulder), Ray Baughman (University of Texas at Dallas), Richard Voyles (Purdue University), Lining Yao (Carnegie Mellon University), and Dan Inman (University of Michigan).

The Frontiers of Fairness in Machine Learning

Date Published: 23 Oct 2018

[BibTeX] [Download PDF]
@techreport{alex2018frontiers,
  author={Alexandra Chouldechova and Aaron Roth},
  title={The Frontiers of Fairness in Machine Learning},
  institution={Computing Community Consortium},
  year={2018},
  number={Workshop Report 1},
  address={Washington, D.C.},
  month={10},
  url={https://cra.org/ccc/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2018/01/The-Frontiers-of-Fairness-in-Machine-Learning.pdf},
  note={}
}

Workshop report from the CCC's March 2018 workshop on Fair Representation and Fair Interactive Learning, authored by Alexandra Chouldechova (Carnegie Mellon University) and Aaron Roth (University of Pennsylvania).

Abstract: "The last few years have seen an explosion of academic and popular interest in algorithmic fairness. Despite this interest and the volume and velocity of work that has been produced recently, the fundamental science of fairness in machine learning is still in a nascent state. In March 2018, we convened a group of experts as part of a CCC visioning workshop to assess the state of the field, and distill the most promising research directions going forward. This report summarizes the findings of that workshop. Along the way, it surveys recent theoretical work in the field and points towards promising directions for research."

Cybersecurity for Manufacturers: Securing the Digitized and Connected Factory

Date Published: 1 Sep 2017

[BibTeX] [Download PDF]
@techreport{jim davis 2017cybersecurity,
  author={Jim Davis and other contributors},
  title={Cybersecurity for Manufacturers: Securing the Digitized and Connected Factory},
  institution={Computing Community Consortium \& MForesight},
  year={2017},
  number={Workshop Report 3},
  address={Washington, D.C.},
  month={9},
  url={https://cra.org/ccc/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2017/10/MForesight-Cybersecurity-Report.pdf},
  note={}
}

MForesight: Alliance for Manufacturing Foresight's Cybersecurity for Manufacturers: Securing The Digitized And Connected Factory workshop report from the CCC and MForesight's 2017 Cyber Security for Manufacturers Workshop.

Research Opportunities and Visions for Smart and Pervasive Health

Date Published: 15 Jun 2017

[BibTeX] [Download PDF]
@techreport{elizabeth mynatt2017research,
  author={Elizabeth Mynatt, Gregory D. Hager, Santosh Kumar, Ming Lin, Shwetak Patel, Jack Stankovic, and Helen Wright},
  title={Research Opportunities and Visions for Smart and Pervasive Health},
  institution={Computing Community Consortium},
  year={2017},
  number={White Paper 7},
  address={Washington, D.C.},
  month={6},
  url={https://cra.org/ccc/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2017/06/SmartandPervasiveHealth-White-Paper-June-2017.pdf},
  note={}
}

Research Opportunities and Visions for Smart and Pervasive Health by Elizabeth Mynatt, Gregory D. Hager, Santosh Kumar, Ming Lin, Shwetak Patel, Jack Stankovic, and Helen Wright was the product of the 2016 Discovery and Innovation in Smart and Pervasive Health.This paper discusses the potential of smart and pervasive health and healthcare approaches, and the challenges and requirements necessary to make such systems a reality.

For citation use: Mynatt E., Hager G. D., Santosh K., Lin M., Patel S., Stankovic J., & Wright H. (2017) Research Opportunities and Visions for Smart and Pervasive Health https://cra.org/ccc/resources/ccc-led-whitepapers/

Artificial Intelligence for Social Good

Date Published: 21 Mar 2017

[BibTeX] [Download PDF]
@techreport{gregory d. hager 2017artificial,
  author={Gregory D. Hager and Ann Drobnis and Fei Fang and Rayid Ghani and Amy Greenwald and Terah Lyons and David C. Parkes and Jason Schultz and Suchi Saria and Stephen F. Smith and Milind Tambe},
  title={Artificial Intelligence for Social Good},
  institution={Computing Community Consortium},
  year={2017},
  number={Workshop Report 2},
  address={Washington, D.C.},
  month={3},
  url={https://cra.org/ccc/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2016/04/AI-for-Social-Good-Workshop-Report.pdf},
  note={}
}

Workshop Report from the CCC and AAAI's 2016 AI for Social Good Workshop focused around how AI can contribute to urban computing, sustainability, health, and public welfare.

Authored by Gregory D. Hager, Ann Drobnis, Fei Fang, Rayid Ghani, Amy Greenwald, Terah Lyons, David C. Parkes, Jason Schultz, Suchi Saria, Stephen F. Smith, and Milind Tambe.

Nanotechnology Inspired Information Processing System of the Future

Date Published: 10 Feb 2017

[BibTeX] [Download PDF]
@techreport{r2017nanotechnology,
  author={Randy Bryant and Mark Hill and Tom Kazior and Daniel Lee and Jie Liu and Klara Nahrstedt and Vijay Narayanan and Jan Rabaey and Hava Siegelmannand  Naresh Shanbhag and Naveen Verma and H.-S. Philip Wong},
  title={Nanotechnology-inspired Information Processing Systems of the Future},
  institution={Computing Community Consortium},
  year={2017},
  number={Workshop Report 1},
  address={Washington, D.C.},
  month={2},
  url={https://cra.org/ccc/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2016/04/15591-CRA-Nanotech-workshop-report-v4.pdf},
  note={}
}

The 1.5-day Nanotechnology-inspired Information Processing Systems visioning workshop brought together a broad community of leading researchers from the areas of computing, neuroscience, systems, architecture, integrated circuits, and nanoscience, to think broadly and deeply about ideas for designing information processing platforms of the future on beyond CMOS nanoscale process technologies in the context of three application driven platform-focused topical areas – cloud-based, autonomous, and human-centric systems.

Authored by Randy Bryant, Mark Hill, Tom Kazior, Daniel Lee, Jie Liu, Klara Nahrstedt, Vijay Narayanan, Jan Rabaey, Hava Siegelmann, Naresh Shanbhag, Naveen Verma, H.-S. Philip Wong.

Privacy by Design – Engineering Privacy

Date Published: 1 Jan 2017

[BibTeX] [Download PDF]
@techreport{various workshop participants2017privacy,
  author={various workshop participants},
  title={Privacy by Design-Catalyzing Privacy by Design},
  institution={Computing Community Consortium},
  year={2017},
  number={},
  address={Washington, D.C.},
  month={1},
  url={https://cra.org/ccc/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2015/12/PbD3-Workshop-Report-v2.pdf},
  note={}
}

Privacy by Design – Catalyzing Privacy by Design workshop report.

The third workshop took place in late August in Pittsburgh to discuss the emerging challenges in engineering privacy. An interdisciplinary group of 65 participants had expertise spanning cryptography, software engineering, technology policy, and law. The workshop was structured in a single track with 14 sessions, most of which featured a panel of speakers followed by very active participant discussions. The session topics include “Requirements and Policy Languages,” “Practical DeIdentification,” and “Design Patterns for Privacy,” among others. Two sessions were dedicated to an interactive critique of three prototype privacy tools.

Privacy by Design – Privacy Enabling Design

Date Published: 1 Dec 2016

[BibTeX] [Download PDF]
@techreport{justin hemmings 2016privacy,
  author={Justin Hemmings and Marie Le Pichon and Peter Swire},
  title={Privacy by Design-Privacy Enabling Design},
  institution={Computing Community Consortium},
  year={2016},
  number={Workshop Report 2},
  address={Washington, D.C.},
  month={12},
  url={https://cra.org/ccc/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2015/05/PbD2-Report-v5.pdf},
  note={}
}

Privacy by Design – Privacy Enabling Design workshop report.

The second workshop took place in May, 2015 in Atlanta, Georgia, focusing on privacy principles in the design process and how designers can take a more active role in the conversation. A group of over 50 collaborators were in attendance, representing various parts of industry, academia, government and civil society, including legal, philosophy, and computer science academics; researchers and members of industry; and designers from various major design firms.

CCC Cyber-Social Learning Systems Workshop 1 Narrative Summary

Date Published: 29 Aug 2016

[BibTeX] [Download PDF]
@techreport{kevin sullivan2016ccc,
  author={Kevin Sullivan, Charles Friedman, Joshua Rubin, and Organizing Committee Members},
  title={CCC Cyber-Social Learning Systems Workshop 1 Narrative Summary},
  institution={Computing Community Consortium},
  year={2016},
  number={Narrative Summary 1},
  address={Washington, D.C.},
  month={8},
  url={https://cra.org/ccc/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2016/04/CSLS-Workshop-1-Narrative-Summary.pdf}
}

Narrative summary of the first Cyber Social Learning Systems (CSLS) workshop, in the three part series of workshops on the topic.

Arch2030: A Vision of Computer Architecture Research over the Next 15 Years

Date Published: 18 Jun 2016

[BibTeX] [Download PDF]
@techreport{luis ceze 2016arch2030,
  author={Luis Ceze and Mark D. Hill and Thomas F. Wenisch},
  title={Arch2030: A Vision of Computer Architecture Research over the Next 15 Years},
  institution={Computing Community Consortium},
  year={2016},
  number={Workshop Report 1},
  address={Washington, D.C.},
  month={6},
  url={https://cra.org/ccc/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2016/12/15447-CCC-ARCH-2030-report-v3-1-1.pdf},
  note={}
}

The Arch2030: A Vision of Computer Architecture Research over the Next 15 Years workshop report resulted from discussions held during the Arch2030 Workshop18 at ISCA 2016, organized by Luis Ceze (University of Washington) and Thomas Wenisch (University of Michigan) and shepherded by Mark Hill (CCC/University of Wisconsin).

"Application trends, device technologies and the architecture of systems drive progress in information technologies. However, the former engines of such progress – Moore’s Law and Dennard Scaling – are rapidly reaching the point of diminishing returns. The time has come for the computing community to boldly confront a new challenge: how to secure a foundational future for information technology’s continued progress. The computer architecture community engaged in several visioning exercises over the years. Five years ago, we released a white paper, 21st Century Computer Architecture, which influenced funding programs in both academia and industry. More recently, the IEEE Rebooting Computing Initiative explored the future of computing systems in the architecture, device, and circuit domains. This report stems from an effort to continue this dialogue, reach out to the applications and devices/circuits communities, and understand their trends and vision. We aim to identify opportunities where architecture research can bridge the gap between the application and device domains."

Computer-Aided Personalized Education

Date Published: 12 Nov 2015

[BibTeX] [Download PDF]
@techreport{rajeev alur 2015computer,
  author={Rajeev Alur and Richard Baraniuk and Rastislav Bodik and Ann Drobnis and Sumit Gulwani and Bjoern Hartmann and Yasmin Kafai and Jeff Karpicke and Ran Libeskind-Hadas and Debra Richardson and Armando Solar-Lezama and Candace Thille and Moshe Vardi},
  title={Computer-Aided Personalized Education},
  institution={Computing Community Consortium},
  year={2015},
  number={Workshop Report 4},
  address={Washington, D.C.},
  month={11},
  url={https://cra.org/ccc/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2016/05/15013-CCC-Cape-Report-508.pdf},
  note={}
}

Workshop report from the 2015 Computer-Aided Personalized Education (CAPE) workshop. The goal of this workshop was to bring together researchers developing educational tools based on technologies such as logical reasoning and machine learning with researchers in education, human-computer interaction, and psychology to articulate a long-term research agenda. The focus was on college-level courses in computer science, mathematics, and physics. The report discusses the emerging trends in computer-aided personalized education and provides a roadmap for future research.

Promoting Strategic Research on Inclusive Access to Rich Online Content and Services

Date Published: 24 Sep 2015

[BibTeX] [Download PDF]
@techreport{shane kane 2015promoting,
  author={Shane Kane and Richard Ladner and Clayton Lewis},
  title={Promoting Strategic Research on Inclusive Access to Rich Online Content and Services},
  institution={Computing Community Consortium},
  year={2015},
  number={Workshop Report 3},
  address={Washington, D.C.},
  month={9},
  url={https://cra.org/ccc/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2016/04/Inclusive-Access-Report.pdf},
  note={}
}

Workshop report from the 2015 Promoting Strategic Research on Inclusive Access to Rich Online Content and Services workshop. The workshop brought researchers and stakeholders from the disability community together with researchers from relevant areas of computing research (such as computer vision, or natural language processing) to identify strategic opportunities to solve pervasive accessibility challenges through computing. The report highlights the research opportunities and gaps in current research surrounding inclusive online content.

Workshop on Quantification, Communication, and Interpretation of Uncertainty in Simulation and Data Science

Date Published: 19 Aug 2015

[BibTeX] [Download PDF]
@techreport{ross whitaker2015workshop,
  author={Ross Whitaker, William Thompson, James Berger, Baruch Fischhof, Michael Goodchild, Mary Hegarty, Christopher Jermaine, Kathryn S. McKinley, Alex Pang, and Joanne Wendelberger},
  title={Workshop on Quantification, Communication, and Interpretation of Uncertainty in Simulation and Data Science},
  institution={Computing Community Consortium},
  year={2015},
  number={Workshop Report 6},
  address={Washington, D.C.},
  month={8},
  url={https://cra.org/ccc/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2014/10/CCC-Uncertainty-Report-Final.pdf}
}

In October 2014 the CCC held a workshop on Uncertainty in Computation Workshop. Modern science, technology, and politics are all permeated by data that comes from people, measurements, or computational processes. However, data is often incomplete, corrupt, or lacking in sufficient accuracy and precision. While concern for these uncertainties would seem essential to rational decision making, explicit consideration of uncertainty is rarely part of the computational and decision making pipeline. Now is the appropriate time to hold a discussion about future research directions related to the modeling of uncertainty in computations and the ways in which the uncertainty inherent in many computational processes can be communicated to those tasked with making decisions based on such data.

Mathematical Foundations for Social Computing Workshop Report

Date Published: 1 Aug 2015

[BibTeX] [Download PDF]
@techreport{yiling chen 2015mathematical,
  author={Yiling Chen and Arpita Ghosh and Michael Kearns and Tim Roughgarden and Jennifer Wortman Vaughan},
  title={Mathematical Foundations for Social Computing},
  institution={Computing Community Consortium},
  year={2015},
  number={Workshop Report 2},
  address={Washington, D.C.},
  month={8},
  url={https://cra.org/ccc/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2015/06/CCC-Social-Computing-Report.pdf},
  note={}
}

The Theoretical Foundations for Social Computing Workshop report. Social computing encompasses the mechanisms through which people interact with computational systems: crowdsourcing systems, ranking and recommendation systems, online prediction markets, citizen science projects, and collaboratively edited wikis, to name a few. These systems share the common feature that humans are active participants, making choices that determine the input to, and therefore the output of, the system. The output of these systems can be viewed as a joint computation between machine and human, and can be richer than what either could produce alone. The term social computing is often used as a synonym for several related areas, such as “human computation” and subsets of “collective intelligence”; we use it in its broadest sense to encompass all of these things.

Authored by Yiling Chen, Arpita Ghosh, Michael Kearns, Tim Roughgarden, and Jennifer Wortman Vaughan.

Privacy by Design – State of Research and Practice

Date Published: 2 May 2015

[BibTeX] [Download PDF]
@techreport{nicholas doty 2015privacy,
  author={Nicholas Doty and Ann Drobnis and Deidre Mulligan and Richmond Wong},
  title={Privacy by Design-State of Research and	Practice},
  institution={Computing Community Consortium},
  year={2015},
  number={Workshop Report 1},
  address={Washington, D.C.},
  month={5},
  url={https://cra.org/ccc/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2015/05/PbD-Workshop-1-Report-.pdf},
  note={}
}

Privacy by Design – State of Research and Practice workshop report.

In order to identify a shared research vision to support these different facets of the practice of Privacy by Design, the Computing Community Consortium (CCC) is sponsoring a series of four workshops throughout 2015. The first workshop took place in February in Berkeley, California, focusing on concepts of privacy and how different groups think about and approach privacy in their receptive domains.

A New Age of Computing and the Brain

Date Published: 3 Dec 2014

[BibTeX] [Download PDF]
@techreport{poll2014new,
  author={Polland Golland and Jack Gallant and Greg Hager and Hanspeter Pfister and Christos Papadimitriou and Stefan Schaal and Joshua T. Vogelstein},
  title={A New Age of Computing and the Brain},
  institution={Computing Community Consortium},
  year={2014},
  number={Workshop Report 2},
  address={Washington, D.C.},
  month={12},
  url={https://cra.org/ccc/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2014/12/BRAIN-Report.pdf},
  note={}
}

Workshop Report from the CCC's 2014 BRAIN workshop. On April 2, 2013, President Obama launched the Brain Research though Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative as a bold new research effort to revolutionize our understanding of the human mind and uncover new ways to treat, prevent, and cure brain disorders. The initiative is a joint program with funding through the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the National Science Foundation (NSF). This two-day workshop, sponsored by the CCC and NSF, brought together brain researchers and computer scientists for a scientific dialogue aimed at exposing new opportunities for joint research in the interface between the two fields.

Including contributions by: Polina Golland, Jack Gallant, Greg Hager, Hanspeter Pfister, Christos Papadimitriou, Stefan Schaal, Joshua T. Vogelstein.

A U.S. Research Roadmap for Human Computation

Date Published: 18 Jun 2014

[BibTeX] [Download PDF]
@techreport{pietro michelucci2014u.s.,
  author={Pietro Michelucci, Janis Dickinson, Haym Hirsh, and Lea Shanley},
  title={A U.S. Research Roadmap for Human Computation},
  institution={Computing Community Consortium},
  year={2014},
  number={Workshop Report 2},
  address={Washington, D.C.},
  month={6},
  url={https://cra.org/ccc/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2015/05/Final-HC-Report.pdf}
}

Workshop report from the CCC's 2014 Human Computation Roadmap Summit. The workshop engaged a highly diverse group of world-class researchers and innovators in a 2.5 day workshop to explore the past and prospective impact of human computation and to clearly delineate the research areas and activities that will lead directly to the most beneficial national and societal outcomes. The report proposes new project ideas for human computation and proposes a set a questions for the next generation of human computation.

Workshops on Extreme Scale Design Automation (ESDA) Challenges and Opportunities for 2025 and Beyond Report

Date Published: 21 Feb 2014

[BibTeX] [Download PDF]
@techreport{r. iris bahar 2014workshops,
  author={R. Iris Bahar and Alex K. Jones and Srinivas Katkoori and Patrick H. Madden and Diana Marculescu and Igor L. Markov},
  title={Workshops on Extreme Scale Design Automation (ESDA) Challenges and Opportunities for 2025 and Beyond},
  institution={Computing Community Consortium},
  year={2014},
  number={Workshop Report 1},
  address={Washington, D.C.},
  month={2},
  url={https://cra.org/ccc/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2015/05/CCC\_ESDA-Report.pdf},
  note={}
}

This report was the product of three workshops on Extreme Scale Design Automation and focuses on how the electronic design automation (EDA) community can address major changes to circuits and electronic systems including, "new interconnects and switching devices with atomic-scale uncertainty, the depth and scale of on-chip integration, electronic system-level integration, the increasing significance of software, as well as more effective means of design entry, compilation, algorithmic optimization, numerical simulation, pre- and post-silicon design validation, and chip test."

The authors of the report are R. Iris Bahar, Alex K. Jones, Srinivas Katkoori, Patrick H. Madden, Diana Marculescu, and Igor L. Markov

Workshop on Opportunities in Robotics, Automation, and Computer Science

Date Published: 21 Oct 2013

[BibTeX] [Download PDF]
@techreport{various workshop organizers2013workshop,
  author={various workshop organizers},
  title={Workshop on Opportunities in Robotics, Automation, and Computer Science},
  institution={Computing Community Consortium},
  year={2013},
  number={Workshop Report 3},
  address={Washington, D.C.},
  month={10},
  url={https://cra.org/ccc/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2016/02/NSF-OSTP-CCC-RVO-Workshop-Report-Oct21-2013.pdf}
}

Workshop on Opportunities in Robotics, Automation, and Computer Science Workshop on Opportunities in Robotics, Automation, and Computer Science Report

Multidisciplinary Research for Online Education

Date Published: 11 Feb 2013

[BibTeX] [Download PDF]
@techreport{douglas h. fisher 2013multidisciplinary,
  author={Douglas H. Fisher and Armando Fox},
  title={Multidisciplinary Research for Online Education},
  institution={Computing Community Consortium},
  year={2013},
  number={Workshop Report 2},
  address={Washington, D.C.},
  month={2},
  url={https://cra.org/ccc/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2013/02/CCC-MROE-Report.pdf},
  note={}
}

Workshop report from the 2013 Multidisciplinary Research for Online Education focused on addressing education-relevant research in areas such as intelligent student modeling through data mining, mobile computing for data logging, social networking, serious games, intelligent learning environments, HCI to facilitate educational interactions, computer-supported collaborative learning, interactive visualizations and simulations, and many other areas, to include research at the interface of computing and the social/behavioral sciences.

Research Needs for Trustworthy, and Reliable Semiconductors Report

Date Published: 15 Jan 2013

[BibTeX] [Download PDF]
@techreport{2013research,
  author={Andrew Appel and Chris Daverse and Kenneth Hines and Rafic Makki and Keith Marzullo and Celia Merzbacher and Ron Perez and Fred Schneider and Mani Soma and Yervant Zorian},
  title={Research Needs for Trustworthy, and Reliable Semiconductors},
  institution={Computing Community Consortium},
  year={2013},
  number={Workshop Report 1},
  address={Washington, D.C.},
  month={1},
  url={https://cra.org/ccc/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2015/05/sa-ts-workshop-report-final-4.pdf},
  note={}
}

This report is the result of a workshop held January 15-16, 2013 in Arlington, Virginia at which experts from the semiconductor and software/programming language communities convened to discuss approaches in their respective fields to improving reliability, trustworthiness, and security. The workshop organizing committee, agenda, and attendees are shown in Appendices to this report. The objective was to identify research based on the state of the art in each community that can lead to a “foundation of trust” in our world of intelligent, interconnected systems built on secure, trustworthy, and reliable semiconductors. While the workshop allowed the communities to learn about the approaches and capabilities for ensuring correctness in their respective areas, it also revealed the differences in focus, priorities, and cultures between the semiconductor industry and software academic researchers.

Computing and Healthcare: New Opportunities and Directions

Date Published: 12 Oct 2012

[BibTeX] [Download PDF]
@techreport{kevin johnson 2012computing,
  author={Kevin Johnson and Eric Horvitz and Gregory D. Hager},
  title={Computing and Healthcare: New Opportunities and Directions},
  institution={Computing Community Consortium},
  year={2012},
  number={},
  address={Washington, D.C.},
  month={},
  url={https://cra.org/ccc/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2015/01/Computing-and-Health-Workshop-Report.pdf},
  note={}
}

This report was the product of the CCC's 2012 Computing and Healthcare: New Opportunities and Directions workshop. "Panel presentations and discussions were organized to frame the three themes of the symposium. Subsequent breakout groups discussed a variety of more focused topics, all with the goal of answering four key questions: 1) What are underecognized, poorly understood or unrealized opportunities for enhancing healthcare using advances in computing coupled with system-scale (re)engineering? 2) What are fundamental technical and non-technical barriers to making progress on the above? 3) What are the basic and applied scientific questions that these barriers pose? 4) How can we measure progress, and what “instrumentation” of the healthcare system would be necessary to measure that progress?" The report summarizes the conversation and conclusions around these questions.

Computing for Disasters Executive Summary

Date Published: 25 Jun 2012

[BibTeX] [Download PDF]
@techreport{robin murphy 2012computing,
  author={Robin Murphy and Trevor Darrell and Hans-Werner Braun and K. Mani Chandy and Ed Fox and Susan Metros and Elena Messina and Paul Oh and Leysia Palen and Ramesh Rao and Shashi Shekhar and Ben Shneiderman},
  title={Computing for Disasters Executive Summary},
  institution={Computing Community Consortium},
  year={2012},
  number={Executive Summary 1},
  address={Washington, D.C.},
  month={6},
  url={https://cra.org/ccc/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2015/05/computingfordisasters.pdf},
  note={}
}

Executive Summary from the CCC's 2012 Computing for Disaster workshop report. You can read the full workshop report, titled CRICIS: Critical Real-time Computing and Information Systems here.

CRICIS: Critical Real-time Computing and Information Systems

Date Published: 25 Jun 2012

[BibTeX] [Download PDF]
@techreport{robin murphy 2012cricis,
  author={Robin Murphy and Trevor Darrell and Hans-Werner Braun and K. Mani Chandy and Ed Fox and Susan Metros and Elena Messina and Paul Oh and Leysia Palen and Ramesh Rao and Shashi Shekhar and Ben Shneiderman},
  title={CRICIS: Critical Real-time Computing and Information Systems},
  institution={Computing Community Consortium},
  year={2012},
  number={Workshop Report 2},
  address={Washington, D.C.},
  month={6},
  url={https://cra.org/ccc/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2015/05/CCC-CRICIS-REPORT.pdf},
  note={}
}

The CRICIS report is the workshop report from the CCC's 2014 Computing for Disaster Management Workshop. This report was produced by the steering committee for the workshop, comprising: Robin Murphy, co-chair, Texas A&M University, et al. View page 25 of the report for the full list of authors.

From GPS and Virtual Globes to Spatial Computing – 2020: The Next Transformative Technology

Date Published: 1 Jan 2012

[BibTeX] [Download PDF]
@techreport{peggy agouris 2012gps,
  author={Peggy Agouris and Walid Aref and Michael F. Goodchild and  Erik Hoel and John Jensen and Craig A. Knoblock and  Richard Langley and Ed Mikhail and Shashi Shekhar and Ouri Wolfson and May Yuan},
  title={From GPS and Virtual Globes to Spatial Computing - 2020: The Next Transformative Technology},
  institution={Computing Community Consortium},
  year={2012},
  number={},
  address={Washington, D.C.},
  month={1},
  url={https://cra.org/ccc/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2015/05/Spatial\_Computing\_Report-2013.pdf},
  note={}
}

The CCC From GPS and Virtual Globes to Spatial Computing – 2020 workshop report.

This document is a direct outcome of the Computing Community Consortium (CCC) visioning workshop From GPS and Virtual Globes to Spatial Computing-2020, held at the National Academies’ Keck Center, September 10th-11th, 2012. It was created in response to the need to arrive at a convergence of interdisciplinary developments across geography, computer science, cognitive science, environmental science, etc. The workshop sought to promote a unified agenda for spatial computing research and development across U.S. agencies, industries (e.g., IBM, Microsoft, Oracle, Google, AT&T, Garmin, ESRI, UPS, Rockwell, Lockheed Martin, Navteq, etc.), and universities. The workshop program exhibited diversity across organizations (e.g., industry, academia, and government), disciplines (e.g., geography, computer science, cognitive science, environmental science, etc.), topics (e.g., science, service, system, and cross-cutting), and communities (e.g., ACM SIGSPATIAL, UCGIS, the National Research Council’s Mapping Science Committee, etc.).

Science, Engineering, and Education of Sustainability: The Role of Information Sciences and Engineering

Date Published: 10 May 2011

[BibTeX] [Download PDF]
@techreport{r2011science,,
  author={Randal Bryant and Douglas Fisher and Erwin Gianchandani and Carla Gomes and William Rouse and Prashant Shenoy and Robert Sproull and David Waltz},
  title={Science, Engineering, and Education of Sustainability: The Role of Information Sciences and Engineering},
  institution={Computing Community Consortium},
  year={2011},
  number={},
  address={Washington, D.C.},
  month={5},
  url={https://cra.org/ccc/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2015/05/RISES\_Workshop\_Final\_Report-5-10-2011.pdf},
  note={This is a note}
}

Workshop report from the CCC's 2011 Role of Information Sciences and Engineering in Sustainability that explored and define fundamental research challenges and applications of the information sciences and engineering in sustainability, including energy and transportation, and identified approaches to improving the smart grid and similar products and services.

Towards a science of open source systems

Date Published: 1 Nov 2010

[BibTeX] [Download PDF]
@techreport{walt scacchi 2010towards,
  author={Walt Scacchi and Kevin Crowston and Chris Jensen and Greg Madey and Megan Squire and Thomas Alspaugh and Les Gasser and Scott Hissam and Yuzo Kanomata and Hamid Ekbia and Kangning Wei and Charles Schweik},
  title={Towards a Science of Open Source Systems},
  institution={Computing Community Consortium},
  year={2010},
  number={Workshop Report 2},
  address={Washington, D.C.},
  month={11},
  url={https://cra.org/ccc/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2015/05/CCC-FOSS-FinalReport-29Nov10.pdf},
  note={}
}

The report from the 2010 FOSS Workshop on the Future of Research in Free/Open Source Software.

Open source systems are beginning to appear in many diverse disciplines, though perhaps the area with the highest level of activity, visibility, and impact is free/open source software (FOSS) systems. FOSS systems are being researched and developed by fast growing communities of academic and industrial practitioners in different disciplines.

Authored by Walt Scacchi, Kevin Crowston, Chris Jensen, Greg Madey, Megan Squire, Thomas Alspaugh, Les Gasser, Scott Hissam, Yuzo Kanomata, Hamid Ekbia, Kangning Wei, Charles Schweik, and others from the 2010 FOSS Workshop on the Future of Research in Free/Open Source Software.

Workshop on Advancing Computer Architecture Research (ACAR-II) Laying a New Foundation for IT: Computer Architecture for 2025 and Beyond

Date Published: 20 Sep 2010

[BibTeX] [Download PDF]
@techreport{mark oskin 2010workshop,
  author={Mark Oskin and Josep Torrellas and Chita Das and John Davis and Sandhya Dwarkadas and Lieven Eeckhout and Bill Feiereisen and Daniel Jimenez and Mark Hill and Marha Kim and James Larus and Margaret Martonosi and Onur Mutlu and Kunle Olukotun and Andrew Putnam and Tim Sherwood and James Smith and David Wood and Craig Zilles},
  title={Workshop on Advancing Computer Architecture Research (ACAR-II) Laying a New Foundation for IT: Computer Architecture for 2025 and Beyond},
  institution={Computing Community Consortium},
  year={2010},
  number={Workshop Report 2},
  address={Washington, D.C.},
  month={9},
  url={https://cra.org/ccc/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2015/06/ACAR2-Report.pdf},
  note={}
}

The Workshop on Advancing Computer Architecture Research (ACAR-II) report Laying a New Foundation for IT: Computer Architecture for 2025 and Beyond is the output of a September 2010 CCC workshop to "identify the key computer architecture research challenges in devising the programmable parallel computing platforms of years 2020-2025, and to articulate an agenda and roadmap to address these challenges." Written by: Josep Torrellas et. al.

Workshop on Advancing Computer Architecture Research (ACAR-1) Report – Failure is not an Option: Popular Parallel Programming

Date Published: 22 Feb 2010

[BibTeX] [Download PDF]
@techreport{mark oskin 2010workshop,
  author={Mark Oskin and Josep Torrellas and Chita Das and John Davis and Sandhya Dwarkadas and Lieven Eeckhout and Bill Feiereisen and Daniel Jimenez and Mark Hill and Marha Kim and James Larus and Margaret Martonosi and Onur Mutlu and Kunle Olukotun and Andrew Putnam and Tim Sherwood and James Smith and David Wood and Craig Zilles},
  title={Workshop on Advancing Computer Architecture Research (ACAR-II) Laying a New Foundation for IT: Computer Architecture for 2025 and Beyond},
  institution={Computing Community Consortium},
  year={2010},
  number={Workshop Report 1},
  address={Washington, D.C.},
  month={2},
  url={https://cra.org/ccc/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2015/06/ACAR\_Report\_Popular-Parallel-Programming.pdf},
  note={}
}

The Workshop on Advancing Computer Architecture Research (ACAR-1) report Failure is not an Option: Popular Parallel Programming is the output of a February 2010 CCC workshop to "identify the key computer architecture research challenges in devising the programmable parallel computing platforms of years 2020-2025, and to articulate an agenda and roadmap to address these challenges." Written by: Josep Torrellas et. al.

A Roadmap for Education Technology

Date Published: 1 Dec 2009

[BibTeX] [Download PDF]
@techreport{beverly park woolf 2009roadmap,
  author={Beverly Park Woolf and Valerie Shute and Kurt VanLehn and Winslow Burleson and John L. King and Dan Suthers and Bert Bredeweg and Rose Luckin and Ryan S. J. D. Baker and Emma Tonkin},
  title={A Roadmap for Education Technology},
  institution={Computing Community Consortium},
  year={2009},
  number={Workshop Report 3},
  address={Washington, D.C.},
  month={12},
  url={https://cra.org/ccc/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2015/05/GROE-Roadmap-for-Education-Technology-Final-Report.pdf},
  note={}
}

Workshop report from a series of workshops the CCC hosted on learning and education technology. The report considers some the greatest challenges and opportunities for education in the 21st century and how technology, specifically computing, can play a role.

Summary from the Third Cross-Layer Reliability Meeting

Date Published: 29 Oct 2009

[BibTeX] [Download PDF]
@techreport{various workshop organizers2009summary,
  author={various workshop organizers},
  title={Summary from the Third Cross-Layer Reliability Meeting},
  institution={Computing Community Consortium},
  year={2009},
  number={Workshop Report 7},
  address={Washington, D.C.},
  month={10},
  url={https://cra.org/ccc/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2021/03/relxlayer\_meeting3\_summary.pdf},
  note={}
}

The Cross-layer Reliability (RelXLayer) visioning process addresses the fact that we will no longer be able to reliably design or manufacture fault-free hardware systems. Learn more on the workshop website.

CCC Workshop on Computer Science and Global Development

Date Published: 1 Aug 2009

[BibTeX] [Download PDF]
@techreport{various workshop organizers2009ccc,
  author={various workshop organizers},
  title={CCC Workshop on Computer Science and Global Development},
  institution={Computing Community Consortium},
  year={2009},
  number={Workshop Report 6},
  address={Washington, D.C.},
  month={8},
  url={http://archive2.cra.org/ccc/files/docs/CCC\_GD\_Summary.pdf}
}

On August 1-2, 2009, approximately fifty participants gathered in Berkeley to discuss the future of Computer Science research supporting global socio- economic development. Over a rich two days of discussion, deliberation and decision-making, we arrived at some major decisions, identified contentious points for further discussion, and decided on next steps for the community. These outcomes are summarized in this document.

Summary from the Second Cross-Layer Reliability Meeting

Date Published: 8 Jul 2009

[BibTeX] [Download PDF]
@techreport{various workshop organizers2009summary,
  author={various workshop organizers},
  title={Summary from the Second Cross-Layer Reliability Meeting},
  institution={Computing Community Consortium},
  year={2009},
  number={Workshop Report 5},
  address={Washington, D.C.},
  month={7},
  url={https://cra.org/ccc/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2021/03/relxlayer\_meeting2\_summary.pdf},
  note={}
}

The Cross-layer Reliability (RelXLayer) visioning process addresses the fact that we will no longer be able to reliably design or manufacture fault-free hardware systems. Learn more on the workshop website.

A Roadmap for US Robotics From Internet to Robotics

Date Published: 21 May 2009

[BibTeX] [Download PDF]
@techreport{h. harry asada 2009roadmap,
  author={H. Harry Asada and Michael S. Branicky and Craig R. Carignan and Henrik I. Christensen and Ronald S. Fearing and William R. Hamel and John M. Hollerbach and Steven M. LaValle and Matthew T. Mason and Bradley J. Nelson and Gill Pratt and Aristides A. G. Requicha and Bryan P. Ruddy and Metin Sitti and Gaurav S. Sukhatme and Russ Tedrake and Richard M. Voyles and Mingjun Zhang},
  title={A Roadmap for US Robotics From Internet to Robotics},
  institution={Computing Community Consortium},
  year={2009},
  number={Workshop Report 2},
  address={Washington, D.C.},
  month={5},
  url={https://cra.org/ccc/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2018/06/A-Roadmap-for-US-Robotics-From-Internet-to-Robotics.pdf},
  note={}
}

This report resulted from a Workshop on Emerging Technologies and Trends that took place 14–15 August 2008 at Snowbird, Utah. The report was part of the Computing Community Consortium (CCC) study on Robotics. The present report has been authored by the workshop organizers and does not reflect the option of CRA, CCC or NSF. The responsibility of the report lies entirely with the authors. The CCC Workshop on Emerging Technologies and Trends was organized by John M. Hollerbach, University of Utah, Matthew T. Mason, Carnegie Mellon University, and Henrik I. Christensen, Georgia Institute of Technology. The workshop was attended by the following people from academia and industry. To see the full list of workshop contributors go to page 86 of the workshop report.

Cyber-Physical Systems Summit Report

Date Published: 1 Apr 2009

[BibTeX] [Download PDF]
@techreport{bruce krogh 2009report,
  author={Bruce Krogh and Edward Lee and Insup Lee and Al Mok and George Pappas and Raj Rajkumar and Harvey Rubin and Alberto Sangiovanni-Vincentelli and Lui Sha and Kang Shin and Jack Stankovic Janos Sztipanovits and Wayne Wolf and Wei Zhao},
  title={Report: Cyber-Physical Systems Summit},
  institution={Computing Community Consortium},
  year={2009},
  number={Workshop Report 1},
  address={Washington, D.C.},
  month={4},
  url={https://cra.org/ccc/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2015/05/CPS\_Summit\_Report.pdf},
  note={}
}

This workshop report is the output of the CCC's 2009 workshops on Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS). The CPS Summit built on the results of a series of NITRD and NSF Workshops exploring trends and key aspects of this emerging area. This report describes in detail the discussions held during the summit.

Summary from the First Cross-Layer Reliability Meeting

Date Published: 26 Mar 2009

[BibTeX] [Download PDF]
@techreport{various workshop organizers2009summary,
  author={various workshop organizers},
  title={Summary from the First Cross-Layer Reliability Meeting},
  institution={Computing Community Consortium},
  year={2009},
  number={Workshop Report 1},
  address={Washington, D.C.},
  month={3},
  url={https://cra.org/ccc/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2021/03/relxlayer\_meeting1\_summary.pdf},
  note={}
}

The Cross-layer Reliability (RelXLayer) visioning process addresses the fact that we will no longer be able to reliably design or manufacture fault-free hardware systems. Learn more on the workshop website.

NetSE Network Design and Engineering Meeting Report

Date Published: 17 Aug 2008

[BibTeX] [Download PDF]
@techreport{david 2008netse,
  author={David Andersen and David Clark and Mike Dahlin and Nick Feamster and Darleen Fisher and Suzi Iacono and Dmitri Krioukov and Craig Partridge and Jennifer Rexford and Amin Vahdat and Ty Znati and Ell Zegura},
  title={NetSE Network Design and Engineering Meeting Report},
  institution={Computing Community Consortium},
  year={2008},
  number={Workshop Report 2},
  address={Washington, D.C.},
  month={8},
  url={https://cra.org/ccc/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2015/05/Network-Report.pdf},
  note={}
}

This meeting report was the output of the Network Design in the NetSE Context workshop part of the Network Science and Engineering (NetSE) workshop series.

Behavior, Computation and Networks in Human Subject Experimentation

Date Published: 31 Jul 2008

[BibTeX] [Download PDF]
@techreport{michael kearns 2008behavior,,
  author={Michael Kearns and Colin Camerer},
  title={Behavior, Computation and Networks in Human Subject Experimentation },
  institution={Computing Community Consortium},
  year={2008},
  number={Workshop Report 4},
  address={Washington, D.C.},
  month={7},
  url={https://cra.org/ccc/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2021/03/Final-BCNNetSEReport.pdf},
  note={}
}

The fundamental premise of the workshop is that the computer science, economics, game theory and sociology communities have been engaged for some time now in healthy and vibrant interaction on theoretical topics, and that the natural and most important next frontier is to introduce a behavioral and experimental component to this exchange.

Towards a Theory of Networked Computation

Date Published: 11 Jun 2008

[BibTeX] [Download PDF]
@techreport{joan feigenbaum 2009towards,
  author={Joan Feigenbaum and Michael Mitzenmacher},
  title={Towards a Theory of Networked Computation},
  institution={Computing Community Consortium},
  year={2009},
  number={Workshop Report 3},
  address={Washington, D.C.},
  month={6},
  url={https://cra.org/ccc/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2021/03/Towards-a-Theory-of-Networked-Computation-.pdf},
  note={}
}

The increasing prominence of the Internet, the Web, and large data-networks in general has profoundly affected social and commercial activity. It has also wrought one of the most profound shifts in Computer Science since its inception.

Visions for Theoretical Computer Science: Status and Impact Report

Date Published: 17 May 2008

[BibTeX] [Download PDF]
@techreport{bernard chazelle 2008visions,
  author={Bernard Chazelle and Anna Karlin and Richard Ladner and Dick Lipton and Salil Vadhan},
  title={Visions for Theoretical Computer Science: Status and Impact Report},
  institution={Computing Community Consortium},
  year={2008},
  number={Workshop Report 1},
  address={Washington, D.C.},
  month={5},
  url={https://cra.org/ccc/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/2015/05/Theory-report-CCC-StatusAndImpact.pdf},
  note={}
}

In Spring 2008, the Computing Community Consortium (CCC) provided funding for a visioning workshop called Visions for Theoretical Computer Science: Status and Impact by the Theoretical Computer Science community at the University of Washington on May 17, 2008 (the day before STOC 2008), as well as follow-up efforts. The purpose of the report is to describe the status and impact of those efforts.