CCC Event Videos

Since its inception, the Computing Community Consortium has hosted dozens of research visioning workshops to envision and discuss the future of computing research. Below you can find the video recordings of past CCC special events.

2017 Events

Over the past several decades, computing and information technologies have shaped our lives, our society, and our physical world in ways we never would have imagined. An increasing number of jobs depend on IT, IT shrinks time and distance in our social lives, agriculture and transportation are rapidly becoming IT-based, and IT holds the promise of revolutionizing education and healthcare. Although many of the IT-powered innovations that are reshaping our society can be traced to fundamental computing-related research, their impact has been magnified through powerful applications in areas of broad societal need and opportunity.

The second CCC Computing Research symposium brought these topics into a program designed to illuminate current and future trends in computing and the potential for computing to address national challenges and societal needs.

The two days were organized around four main themes:

  • Intelligent Infrastructure for our Cities and Communities
  • Security and Privacy for Democracy
  • AI and Amplifying Human Abilities
  • Data, Algorithms, and Fairness

The first playlist features videos from the 2017 Computing Research Symposium panel session. You can also find more information and every video broken up by session here.

The 2017 symposium also featured a poster session that included 47 early career faculty members, post-docs, and graduate students from many fields of computer science. The second playlist includes the videos from the poster presenters who chose to record a short video clip of their presentation. You can find more information about the poster presenters in the CCC Symposium Poster Book or on Symposium Poster Presentations page.

In 2017 the CCC co-sponsored the AAAI 2017 Spring Symposium on AI for Social Good at Stanford University. This symposium focused on the promise of AI across multiple sectors of society, specifically urban computing, healthcare, public welfare and social justice,  sustainability, and security.

You can learn more about the workshop here.

2016 Events

The AAAI Fall Symposium on Accelerating Science: A Grand Challenge for AI (co-sponsored by AAAI and the CRA Computing Community Consortium) aimed to bring together researchers in relevant areas of artificial intelligence (e.g., machine learning, causal inference, knowledge representation and inference, planning, decision making, human computer interaction, distributed problem solving, natural language processing, multi-agent systems, semantic web, information integration, scientific workflows), high performance data and computing infrastructures and services, and selected application areas (e.g., life sciences, learning sciences, health sciences, social sciences, food energy and water nexus) to discuss progress on, and articulate a research agenda aimed at addressing, the AI grand challenge of accelerating science.

You can learn more about the symposium here.

In May, 2016 OSTP announced four workshops (later a fifth was added) surrounding the future of artificial intelligence to explore the opportunities and challenges that AI presents.The CCC co-hosted the second OSTP AI Workshop, Artificial Intelligence for Social Good, with OSTP and AAAI. In this workshop, we discussed the successful deployments and the potential use of AI in various topics that are essential for social good, including but not limited to urban computing, health, environmental sustainability, and public welfare.

Learn more about the speakers and watch the videos broken up by session on the AI for Social Good Speakers page and read the workshop report here.

Over the past several decades, computing and information technologies have shaped our lives, our society, and our physical world in ways we never would have imagined. An increasing number of jobs depend on IT, IT shrinks time and distance in our social lives, agriculture and transportation are rapidly becoming IT-based, and IT holds the promise of revolutionizing education and healthcare. Although many of the IT-powered innovations that are reshaping our society can be traced to fundamental computing-related research, their impact has been magnified through powerful applications in areas of broad societal need and opportunity.

This symposium drew these topics into a program designed to illuminate current and future trends in computing and the potential for computing to address national challenges. The two days were organized around four main themes:

  • The Impact of Computing in Our Physical World
  • Computing Enhancing Our Lives
  • Controlling Our Data
  • Partnerships for the Future

The first playlist features videos from the 2016 Computing Research Symposium panel session. You can also find more information and every video broken up by session here.

The 2016 symposium also featured a poster session that included 47 early career faculty members, post-docs, and graduate students from many fields of computer science. The second playlist includes the videos from the poster presenters who chose to record a short video clip of their presentation. You can find more information about the poster presenters in the CCC Symposium Poster Book or on Symposium Poster Presentations page.

2014 Events

On April 2, 2013, President Obama launched the Brain Research though Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative as a bold new research effort to revolutionize our understanding of the human mind and uncover new ways to treat, prevent, and cure brain disorders.  The initiative is a joint program with funding through the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the National Science Foundation (NSF).

This two-day workshop, sponsored by the Computing Community Consortium (CCC) and National Science Foundation (NSF), brought together brain researchers and computer scientists for a scientific dialogue aimed at exposing new opportunities for joint research in the many exciting facets, established and new, of the interface between the two fields.

Learn more about the workshop on the workshop webpage and read the workshop report here.

This workshop brought together needed interdisciplinary expertise, assess the state of the science at the human, medical, and technology levels, and articulate a research vision for a systems engineering approach to the development of technologies and solutions to support the home management of persons with significant chronic diseases and their family care providers. Effective home management of such chronic diseases as dementia, heart failure, hypertension, chronic obstructive airway disease (COPD), and asthma would reduce hospitalizations and other healthcare costs and improve quality of life. Currently, there is a paucity of research in these aging in place technologies (AiPT) from a systems approach that includes the expertise of both health and computer science. This workshop discussed challenges and opportunities and provide a research agenda regarding the next steps needed in the development and application of technology to home management of chronic diseases.

Learn more about the workshop on the workshop webpage and read the workshop report here.

Between 2009 and 2011, 127 PhD graduates in Computer Science and related fields were awarded Computing Innovation Fellowships, a short-term Postdoctoral Fellowship to help keep recent graduates in the field during the economic downturn. The program has ended and the former CIFellows are now in the early years of their formal careers. This workshop is an opportunity for the former CIFellows to learn from each other and dignitaries from the field as they continue on their career path. Learn more about the CI Fellows program here and find out more about the 2014 workshop here.

2012 and Prior Events

This daylong, invitation-only symposium in Washington, DC, explores the accomplishments and prospects of this coordinated effort — now referred to as the Federal Networking and Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD) Program, and involving 15 Federal agencies as full partners.

Former Vice President Al Gore, who spearheaded the High-Performance Computing Act of 1991, was a featured keynote speaker. Other elements of the program included modules on information technology and people, information technology in the physical world, information technology for the advancement of science, the building blocks of information technology, and the world of data; as well as a forward-looking panel that considers the roles of government, academia, industry, and the research community as a whole in finding and funding the next “Big Ideas.”

Learn more about the NITRD Symposium here.

“Discovery and Innovation in Health IT” was sponsored by the National Science Foundation, the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology , the National Institute of Standards and Technology, the National Library of Medicine, the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, the Computing Community Consortium, and the American  Medical Informatics Association. It was held in San Francisco on October 29 and 30, 2009.

The goals of the workshop were to:

  • Explore and define fundamental research challenges and opportunities in healthcare IT in both the near- and long- term;
  • Provide opportunities for relevant academic and industrial researchers, healthcare practitioners, and IT healthcare suppliers to identify mutual interests in healthcare IT, as they relate to both near- and long- term challenges and solutions;
  • Identify a range of “model” proof-of-concept, integrative systems that might serve as motivating and unifying forces to drive fundamental research in healthcare IT and that might accelerate the transition of research outcomes into products and services;

Learn more about the Discovery and Innovation in Health IT Workshop here.