Tag Archive: Workshop

Fairness and Accountability Task Force will hold a visioning workshop on Economics and Fairness, May 22-23, 2019 in Cambridge, Massachusetts. This workshop will bring together computer science researchers with backgrounds in algorithmic decision making, machine learning, and data science with policy makers, legal experts, economists, and business leaders to discuss methods to ensure economic fairness in a data-driven world. '>

Economics and Fairness

The Computing Community Consortium's (CCC) Fairness and Accountability Task Force will hold a visioning workshop on Economics and Fairness, May 22-23, 2019 in Cambridge, Massachusetts. This workshop will bring together computer science researchers with backgrounds in algorithmic decision making, machine learning, and data science with policy makers, legal experts, economists, and business leaders to discuss methods to ensure economic fairness in a data-driven world.

Early Career Researcher Symposium

The workshop was 1.5 days in the Washington, DC area. It was an opportunity for attendees to meet National Science Foundation program officers as well as representatives from other agencies. The content covered at the workshop came from the 2017 CCC Symposium, recent CCC visioning workshops, and CRA programs for Career Mentoring and Leadership in Science Policy.

Privacy by Design – Catalyzing Privacy by Design

Frontiers in Regulation and Management. This workshop will review the lessons from workshops #1-3 and examine how existing regulatory models, along with other factors, shape organizations’ understanding of privacy problems, approaches, and solutions. Building on workshop-generated insights on the strengths and limitations of current approaches—in terms of concepts, incentives, actors—the workshop will consider how well regulatory models respond to privacy-by-design challenges, and identify open research questions.

This is part of a series of workshops - view the series page

Theoretical Foundations for Social Computing

Social computing encompasses the mechanisms through which people interact with computational systems---for instance, crowdsourcing platforms, ranking and recommendation systems, online prediction markets, or collaboratively edited wikis. Social computing is blossoming into a rich research area of its own, with contributions from diverse disciplines spanning computer science, economics, sociology, systems research, and HCI, to name just a few.