CCC at AAAS 2018

The Computing Community Consortium (CCC) has attended and hosted sessions at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Annual Meeting since 2013. Below you can find links to slides and resources from the 2018 sessions and links to related CCC white papers and resources. To learn more about the 2018 AAAS Meeting visit the webpage.


Rethinking Approaches to Disaster Management and Public Safety With Intelligent Infrastructure

Friday, February 16, 8:00 – 9:30 am

Synopsis: Modern societies can be understood as the intersection of four interdependent systems: the natural environment, the built environment, the social environment of humans and their activities, and an information ecosystem overlaying the other three domains. The latter provides the means for understanding, interacting with, and managing the relationships between the natural, built, and human environments. This increased connectedness creates both new challenges and opportunities that demand new approaches to public safety and emergency management.  The design and integration of intelligent infrastructure — including embedded sensors, the Internet of Things, advanced wireless information technologies, real-time data capture and analysis, and machine-learning-based decision support — holds the potential to greatly enhance public safety, emergency management, disaster recovery, and overall community resilience, while addressing new and emerging threats to public safety and security.

Session Overview Slides

Speakers:

Moderator:

Dan Lopresti
lopresti

Lehigh University


Transforming Cities, Transportation, and Agriculture with Intelligent Infrastructure

Friday, February 16, 10:00 – 11:30 am

Synopsis: Intelligent infrastructure is the deep embedding of sensing, computing, and communications capabilities into traditional physical infrastructure such as roads, buildings, and bridges, in order to increase efficiency, resiliency, and safety. For example, embedding controllers, intersection schedulers, and sensors along roads creates new capabilities for controlling traffic signals and optimizing traffic flow. Across disciplines ranging from engineering to computer science to public policy, intelligent infrastructures are increasingly seen as solutions to the long-standing problems that face local governments. These include strained resources spread across ever-growing urban populations, aging infrastructures and public services systems, competitiveness in the global economy, and acute human and environmental stressors due to rapid growth and change. This session brings together speakers to discuss three critical areas of fundamental scientific research in intelligent infrastructure, and the challenges and barriers to realizing these advances as part of economically sustainable systems.

Session Overview Slides

Speakers:

Moderator:

Elizabeth Mynatt
Elizabeth Mynatt

Georgia Tech


Artificial Intelligence: Augmenting Not Replacing People

Saturday, February 17, 8:00 – 9:30 am

Synopsis: Artificial intelligence (AI) technologies are rapidly maturing into tools that are impacting our everyday lives. However, contrary to popular conception, most of these tools will not be autonomous, stand-alone systems, but rather will manifest as human assistants and augmentations. While autonomous driving is featured in the headlines, the short-term impact of advances in this field will be increased safety, comfort, and convenience, with the driver still at the wheel. New technologies in healthcare will not replace doctors, but will leverage their skill and judgement by providing super-human augmentations for eyes, hands, and intellect. As more robots move onto the manufacturing floor, they are most likely to function as ever-smarter programmable tools, and will still require human coworkers to teach them new tasks and to do those elements that are simply too hard to automate. This panel explores these themes, emphasizing in particular the areas where AI and people will work together to do what neither can do alone. Each talk highlights a particular focus or application and illustrates both the opportunity for human augmentation in that area, as well as the human-machine technology frontiers each presents. The panel will close with a discussion of the opportunities and challenges of AI technologies for human augmentation.

Speakers:

Gregory Hager
Gregory Hager

Johns Hopkins University

Machines Teaching People

Moderator:

Ann Drobnis
Ann Drobnis

Computing Community Consortium

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