Tag Archive: Conference at Snowbird

CRA’s biennial Conference at Snowbird, Utah, is our flagship conference that brings together the chairs of Ph.D.-granting departments of computer science and computer engineering, as well as leaders from U.S. industrial and government computing research laboratories.

UrtasunUrtasun

Highlights from the 2018 CRA Conference at Snowbird


From July 16-18, the Computing Research Association (CRA) held its biennial Conference at Snowbird with more than 300 people in attendance. Every two years, the chairs of computing and information departments, as well as the leaders of government and industrial laboratories from across the country and the world, gather in Snowbird, Utah, to network and discuss common issues concerning the future of the field.

2017 Turing Recipients2017 Turing Recipients

John Hennessy and David Patterson Receive 2017 Turing Award


ACM has named John L. Hennessy, former president of Stanford University, and David A. Patterson, professor emeritus of the University of California, Berkeley, recipients of the 2017 ACM A.M. Turing Award for pioneering a systematic, quantitative approach to the design and evaluation of computer architectures with enduring impact on the microprocessor industry. Patterson is a former CRA Board Chair and will be a plenary speaker at the 2018 CRA Conference at Snowbird, and Hennessy was a plenary speaker at the 2012 CRA Conference at Snowbird.

2018 CRA Conference at Snowbird Program Update


The program for the 2018 CRA Conference at Snowbird has recently been updated. A third plenary session will consist of a panel on “Diversity in Computing Leadership” chaired by Carla Brodley. The confirmed participants include Shinder Dhillon, Head of Global Diversity & Inclusion – Engineering & Corporate Functions, Microsoft, Brian Reaves, Chief Diversity and Inclusion Officer, Dell, Inc., and Ayanna Howard, Chair, School of Interactive Computing at Georgia Tech.

Andrew MooreAndrew Moore

It’s Not About the Money: Optimizing Academic-Industrial Partnerships


Today, more than ever, industry leaders are looking to partner with academic computer science programs. With available computer science expertise at a premium, they’re looking for ideas, for new hires, and for help on crucial projects. Universities are the mother lode for the personnel and expertise they crave. On July 18, I presented at the CRA Conference at Snowbird session titled “Local Corporate Labs, Centers and Development Offices: Optimizing Department/Industry,” which explored the growth of corporate lab culture, and I’d like to share some of insights from that talk.

Save the Dates: Next Two CRA Conferences at Snowbird


The next two CRA Conferences at Snowbird have been scheduled.
2018: Monday, July 16 – Wednesday, July 18.
2020: Tuesday, July 21 – Thursday, July 23.

The upcoming conference dates are revised somewhat from past schedules with the intent of making the Conference more family friendly by avoiding weekends. Because of the long lead time for reserving space at Cliff Lodge, this is being implemented gradually.

We do not record the conference presentations in order to encourage free-flowing discussions, but we do post the presentations by every speaker who provides them to us. For 2016 click: here. Names and sessions highlighted in blue have an associated presentation.

And a special thank you to everyone who submitted evaluations of the 2016 conference. We read this carefully and do our best to improve the conference based upon feedback.

Martonosi and ConteMartonosi and Conte

Whistling Past the Graveyard: What the End of Moore’s Law Means to All of Computing


Is “Moore’s Law” ending? If so, what does this mean to all of us in he field of computing? These questions were discussed at a July 2016 panel at the Computing Research Association’s Conference at Snowbird organized by Conte and Margaret Martonosi of Princeton. The panel included a technologist (Paolo Gargini, Intel fellow-emeritus), three computer architects (David Brooks of Harvard, Mark D. Hill of Wisconsin-Madison, and Tom Conte of Georgia Tech), and a quantum computer scientist (Krysta Svore of Microsoft Research).