Tag Archive: CCCBlog

CIFellows 2021CIFellows 2021

CRA/CCC Announces CIFellows 2021 Program


The Computing Research Association (CRA) and Computing Community Consortium (CCC) are pleased to announce a new Computing Innovation Fellows (CIFellows) cohort for 2021. This program aims to provide career-enhancing bridge experiences for recent and soon-to-be PhD graduates in computing to support the computing research pipeline. The CIFellows program is open to researchers whose work falls under the umbrella of the National Science Foundation (NSF) Computing and Information Science and Engineering (CISE) Directorate.

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I2O PostDoc Fellowship: Deadline March 1


The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) is broadening its commitment to young scientists through a new Information Innovation Office (I2O) PostDoc Fellowship Program focused on postdoctoral researchers in the field of computer science with grants sized to support each fellow for up to two years.

CCC Quadrennial Papers: Core Computer Science


As part of the rollout of the 2020 CRA Quadrennial Papers, the Computing Community Consortium (CCC) is pleased to publish the first four papers around the “Core Computer Science” theme, including papers on post quantum cryptography, the foundations of our algorithmic world, opportunities with next generation wireless technologies and computing challenges in the post-Moore’s Law world.

CCC Quadrennial Papers: Broad Computer Science


As part of the rollout of the 2020 CRA Quadrennial Papers, the Computing Community Consortium (CCC) is pleased to publish the second group of papers around the “Broad Computer Science” theme, including papers on pandemic informatics, infrastructure for AI, High Performance Computing (HPC) and Quantum, robotics in the workforce.

Computing Researchers Respond to COVID-19: Contact Tracing for All? Bridging the Accessibility Gap for Contact Tracing


Automated, proximity-based contact tracing apps use Bluetooth to identify who is near them. In theory, this is a great solution that can be efficiently deployed widely (albeit with many privacy and protocol considerations addressed here), however the assumption is that people have access to mobile phones with Bluetooth and use technology similarly.