Tag Archive: CRA-W

Articles relevant to the CRA Committee on the Status of Women in Computing Research (CRA-W).

Carla BrodleyCarla Brodley

CRA Board Member Highlight: Carla Brodley


For the past 30 years I have had two passions – machine learning (ML) that makes a difference in the real world and increasing diversity in computer science (CS).  For the first 26 years, I focused on my first passion and developed new approaches to ML though applications to remote sensing, neuroscience, digital libraries, astrophysics, content-based image retrieval of medical images, computational biology, chemistry, evidence-based medicine, detecting lesions in the MRIs of epilepsy patients, and predicting disease progression for MS patients. For the last four years, my focus has been on my second passion: increasing diversity in CS.

Expanding the Pipeline: The Computer Science Outreach Program Evaluation Network –  Increasing Quality and Capacity


The National Girls Collaborative Project (NGCP) brings together organizations throughout the United States that are committed to informing and encouraging girls to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering, computer science, and mathematics. NGCP serves more than 35,000 programs in 41 states and uses a collective impact model that builds the capacity of educational programs.

2018 Grad Cohort2018 Grad Cohort

Expanding the Pipeline: 2018 CRA-W Grad Cohort for Women Inspires Attendees to Persist in Computing


On April 13-14, more than 400 women graduate students in computing from more than 150 institutions converged on San Francisco, CA, for the 2018 CRA-W Graduate Cohort for Women (CRA-W Grad Cohort). Throughout the two-day workshop, professional connections were made, new friendships were formed, and mentoring relationships with senior researchers were established. CRA-W organizes this workshop as part of its mission to increase the success and participation of women in computing research.

Expanding the Pipeline: CRA URMD Grad Cohort Fosters a Diverse and Inclusive Generation of Computing Researchers


Approximately 100 graduate students in computing and more than 20 speakers assembled on March 16-17 in San Diego, CA, to convene the inaugural CRA Graduate Cohort for Underrepresented Minorities and Persons with Disabilities (URMD Grad Cohort). It was the first gathering of its kind hosted by CRA. This new iteration of the Grad Cohort Workshop focused on the following underrepresented groups in computing: Alaska Native, Black/African American, Hispanic, Native American, Native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islander, and persons with disabilities. The workshop aimed to increase representation from these groups in computing research by building and mentoring nationwide communities through their graduate studies, and is modeled on the highly successful CRA-W Grad Cohort Workshop for Women.

Julia-HirschbergJulia-Hirschberg

Research Highlight: CRA Board Member Julia Hirschberg


My research sits at the intersection of Natural Language Processing (NLP) and speech processing.  I have focused on identifying the role of prosodic information in speech and using this knowledge to produce more realistic Text-to-Speech Synthesis (TTS) systems; to detect many types of speaker state, including the classic emotions, such as anger, disgust, fear, happiness, sadness, and surprise; and derived emotions, such as confidence and uncertainty, deception, trust, and charisma. I’ve also studied human-machine and human-human behavior in Spoken Dialogue Systems (SDS) and Human-Computer Interaction (HCI).

Women in ComputingWomen in Computing

Expanding the Pipeline: ACM-W Programs Expand to Support Students and Professional Women in Computing


Supporting, celebrating, and advocating for women in computing is the mission that lies at the heart of the activities of ACM-W.  Our longstanding projects of scholarships, celebrations, and student chapters provide opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students to increase their technical knowledge while networking and building community. Recently we have begun to expand our activity to include projects that support populations of women in computing beyond students.  This article provides an overview of all of our projects, old and new.

Expanding the Pipeline: CAHSI Broadens Hispanics’ Participation in Computing


The Computing Alliance for Hispanic-Serving Institutions (CAHSI) is a consortium of Hispanic-serving institutions (HSIs) committed to consolidating the strengths, resources, and efforts of public, private, federal, state, and local organizations that share the core value of increasing the number of Hispanics who pursue and complete baccalaureate and advanced degrees in computing areas. CAHSI plays a critical role in evaluating, documenting, and disseminating effective practices that support students in computing disciplines at the critical junctures in the academic pipeline.

Get involvedGet involved

Get Involved with CRA-Women Activities


CRA-W’s mission is to increase the success and participation of women in computing research and education at all levels. There are several ways you can get involved: